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6

Booted to Internet Recovery Mode you have to remove all non-OS X partitions, modify the partition types and then resize your main volume. The reason why you can't boot your Mac is the bogus partition type (FFFF-FFF....) of your main partition (i=2/sda2). Additionally the Recovery HD partition (i=3/sda3) has the wrong type. Preparation: Restart to Internet ...


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Windows' Disk Management has overwritten the GUID partition table with something unknown. This usually only effects the partition table but not the content of your disk (though it seems to be gone)! A proper GUID partition table has to be restored. The particular obstacle here is: the OP neither has a thumb drive nor a second Mac. Preparation: Backup the ...


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If you have your data safely backed up or don't care about losing it, you can follow these instructions to recreate your Fusion Drive. Boot into Internet Recovery or an OS X bootable drive. From the Utilities menu, open Terminal. Run diskutil cs delete 654B2807-197B-46D1-9919-B75C0290D33A to destroy your current Fusion Drive. This WILL lose all of your ...


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Use Disk Utility from a working machine I don't know why this didn't work in recovery mode, but a friend suggested I plug the SSD into a working Mac with a USB adapter and try using the working Mac's Disk Utility to format the drive. I did, and that worked. Now I'm installing OS X on it using recovery mode. Maybe (I'm speculating) the version of Disk ...


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Open Disk Utility and select the disk in the sidebar (not a partition). Click Partition in the toolbar. Enter the first partition information. Click the + button to add a second partition. Enter the second partition information. The size will be entered automatically from the remaining space. Click Apply.


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I'm a little unclear what your configuration is... If your "128GB SD" is an external drive: Unencrypt the data, reformat macbook, encrypt data again. If your "128GB SD" is the drive that you wish to reformat: Copy the data to another external drive unencrypted, reformat your drive, copy the data back onto it and encrypt it over again. Is there anything ...


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Booted to your main volume or Recovery HD open Terminal and enter (El Capitan installed): diskutil cs resizeStack 7D5C38D3-6682-498B-A003-82580C9EC3D3 1120g or in (Mavericks/Yosemite installed) diskutil cs resizeStack 7D5C38D3-6682-498B-A003-82580C9EC3D3 0g Please add a comment if you get an error .


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Download, install and start Disk-Arbitrator. Activate it in "block mount" mode. Now execute sudo dd if=/path/to/file of=/dev/diskN [operands]. The resulting volume won't be mounted and no file will be created nor a folder will be changed: sh-3.2# ls -laO total 0 drwxrwxr-x 7 user staff - 306 17 Jan 22:21 . drwxrwxrwt@ 8 root admin hidden ...


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There's no such thing as "Built for Snow Leopard". That labeling just an old habit PC manufacturers have for Windows, but it doesn't apply to Macs at all. If Apple lets you run the OS, that means they tested it, and should work just fine. The reason you can't resize those disks is because they are formatted as "ExFAT", and OS X doesn't support resizing ExFAT ...


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Remote Synchronisation: rsync Consider using OS X's Terminal.app and included rsync command line tool to safely copy the data: sudo rsync -vaE --progress /Volumes/SourceName /Volumes/DestinationName See Fastest and safest way to copy massive data from one external drive to another for how this command works and what each section means.



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