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28

I don't have numbers to back up the statement, but using HFS+ non-journaled is a good idea in certain volumes that require absolute speed, without worrying (too much) about a possible "data loss" or "data corruption" in case of power failure or similar. When is using HFS+ Non-journaled a BAD idea? External (USB, FW, ESata) drives that are connected and ...


28

The encrypted volume's password is not required for erasing the disk, only to mount the encrypted volume on the disk. It's unclear whether you're being asked for the password only when connecting the disk, or when you attempt to erase it. In Lion, you can use Disk Utility to erase an encrypted volume, but not in Mountain Lion. However, you can erase the ...


23

From Apple's MacBook Air: Frequently Asked Questions about Software Reinstall Drive: Note: The MacBook Air Software Reinstall Drive is read only. You cannot erase it, reformat it, or reuse it as a general purpose USB storage device. Honestly, thumb drives are dirt cheap these days—why would you want to lose your only way to reinstall your OS?


14

Use the default (case-insensitive) unless you both a) know what you're doing and b) you absolutely have to. There are several programs (Norton Antivirus comes to mind) that won't work properly on a case-sensitive file system. HFS is, by default, case-insensitive but case-preserving (i.e. it doesn't care what you type for comparison purposes, but it will ...


9

Here is a simple recipe for making a USB version of the OS X installer + associated tools. (Migration Assistant, Disk Utility, Network Utility, Terminal (that auto mounts your internal drive as needed), Firmware Utility and Password Reset Utility. 1) Use Disk Utility backup/restore to image whatever Snow Leopard DVD you prefer onto a HFS+ formatted GUID USB ...


9

If your goal is to completely wipe all data which is on your current boot disk, then follow the procedure below. Insert the Mac OS X CD. Restart the computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press and hold the "C" key to start up from CD. When the Installer screen appears, do not click Continue. Instead, choose Installer > Open Disk Utilities. ...


8

I'd say a full format is almost never necessary, though the only thing you'll lose is time. I've got an OS X install that I've migrated from computer A to computer B to computer C and back to B and upgraded from Tiger to Leopard to Snow Leopard (all upgrade-installs, no reformatting or anything) over the past 6 years and it works great.


8

The easiest way is as follows: You will need the original (or a newer) Mac OS X install disk for the computer. Do not use and older version than originally came with the Mac, and do not use the install disk from any other model of Mac. Insert the disk and restart the computer pressing the Option key as it restarts. After about a minute when it loads, click ...


7

Best way to keep it running smoothly is avoiding installing shady software and most of all be very careful if you want to install some cracked stuff. Keep your hard drive checked and from time to time verify it for errors (Disk utility -> verify) and fix them if needed. That's what I do to keep my computers (no matter what OS safe). Just for the ...


7

The built in “Erase all Content and Settings” function (found in the Settings app, under General → Reset) should be sufficient in virtually all cases. The 3GS and later iPhones, 3rd generation and later iPod Touches and all iPads use hardware encryption, where all data is stored encrypted in their flash memory. On these devices the wipe function simply ...


6

The next time you have your USB stick plugged in, open up Trash in the Finder, and you'll see the items that you have deleted in the trash. So, although you are "deleting" files from your USB stick, they are still there, and taking up space. You need to delete the trash when the USB stick is plugged in. This will solve your problem, as long as you remember ...


6

Hold the option key when you power on and you can choose the working mac partition or insert a bootable DVD to get back to disk utility or a working os. This is called the Startup Manager screen. The eject key will work once the Startup Manager is running so you can eject the windows DVD. As I didn't explain the option key - here is a great article ...


6

Time Machine is documented well at http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1427 and this discussion goes into sparse bundles and file vault so it's worth a read http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?threadID=1447315 Since backups to an attached hard disk are written as plain files - that would be easier to connect to a non-Mac system. Backups to a Time Capsule are ...


6

diskutil list In my case I wanted to format the parition as NTFS for installing Windows 7 on it. The last parameter is the partition 4 on first disk. diskutil eraseVolume "Tuxera NTFS" my-ntfs disk0s4


6

VideoLAN's VLC is the way to go here, I haven't found a movie file that it can't play.


5

According to this answer, you can use exFAT if your version of Mac OS X and Windows are new enough. That would be at least Mac OS X 10.6.5 and Windows Vista SP1.


5

Normally from the command line, you would use the diskutil command with the zeroDisk, randomDisk or secureErase options to securely wipe a disk. However, I would imagine this doesn't work on the disk you've just booted from. So I suspect you'll either have to find another Mac and connect yours in target disk mode via a Firewire cable, or physically remove ...


4

The answer was that the default formatting was FAT32 which has a limit of 4GB per file. The answer was to format the drive. As I'm copying from Mac to Linux I chose the Ex-FAT format, all the better to interchange with. I used the Disk Utility which is within a 'Utilities' folder which is itself at the bottom of the applications list.


4

Unless you have a very good reason to choose otherwise, it is highly recommended to use a journaling file system to ensure data integrity. In the case of Lion and Mountain Lion, the default is MacOS Extended (Journaled). Case-sensitivity at the disk level can mess with certain apps, and the OS makes it look like files are indeed case-sensitive when you ...


4

OS X can default read NTFS disks, but not write to them. Possible solutions/options: NTFS for Mac OS X (10 Days Trial): I use this one, and it does the job very well. When the driver is installed, you format your NTFS disks with Disk Utility where you select Windows NT Filesystem as the format. Tuxera NTFS for Mac (15 Days Trial): I haven't tried this ...


4

I'll answer the "bad blocks" tack and you can ask a follow on question if you still have slowness and you have concluded that it's not simply bad blocks. (Bad blocks is almost never a slow issue - since the system can remap blocks so rapidly, that you'd need rafts and rafts of them to actually impair I/O. If you do have bad blocks, they can corrupt some of ...


4

My suspicion is that your charger was not the standard AC charger, and the voltage some how blew part of the port hardware, but not all of it. Are you near an Apple Store or a Reseller? They can probably try to boot it, and if it won't be recognized, they may give you a recycling discount on a new shuffle. It's probably not cost conscious to repair when a ...


4

To reinstall Leopard visit this Apple Support page or follow these steps: Insert the Mac OS X Install Disc and double-click the Install Mac OS X icon. Follow the onscreen instructions. In the pane where you select the destination disk, select your current Mac OS X disk (in most cases, it will be the only one available). Click Options. If ...


4

Journaling adds delay and complexity to every operation that will get journaled. Journal writes force data to be written immediately to the drive which can make other outstanding drive transactions slower. A nice treatment of what journaling does is in retired Technical Note TN1150: HFS Plus Volume Format. The journal area on the file system is written ...


4

One or other can break applications, case-insensitive is the default however. If you've been using case-insensitive without issues then there are no guarantees that a transition to case-sensitive will go well. Here's one example from the apple support pages: ...don’t assume your third-party software solutions work correctly with case sensitivity. ...


4

You cannot reformat the startup drive from which you booted (and from which the system is currently running). You would need to boot from a different volume, whether a different partition, or from a DVD.


4

As long as the drive connects to your MacBook Air via a connection protocol that the Air supports like Thunderbolt or USB 2 or USB 3 you can format the drive and use it with your Mac just fine. To format an external hard drive on your Mac (paraphrased from here): Connect the drive to your Mac Open Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility On the left ...


3

Paragon NTFS or Tuxera NTFS Paragon NTFS and Tuxera NTFS will let you read/write NTFS partitions on OS X. They integrate with Disk Utility as well, letting you erase and partition such disks.


3

None of the HFS flavors will offer any performance benefit that's measurable. I have seen encryption slow down some storage medium such as slow USB flash and I would expect journaling there to also be more of a slowdown than on storage with fast cache or more responsive write service times. I suppose journaling could in some rare circumstances (bizarre edge ...



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