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26

I actually think the idea of a single, unified, development environment like what you're after is somewhat antithetical to OS X design principles. One of the great things I've found, since switching to OS X for development work about a year ago, is that many OS X application developers share my own personal philosophy when it comes to software: do less, but ...


22

The current low level Mac Mini with an upgrade to 4GB memory is probably the best bang for your buck. That's what I have except with 8GB; got my memory from Amazon for $130, cheaper than Apple memory. It's a very capable machine. If you use a lot of programs simultaneously, the standard 2GB is kinda cramped, but 4GB would do fine; it just seemed like a good ...


20

You'll do just fine with a MacBook Air, at least, that's what I'd go for (and I'm in love with the Air as well :)) I will miss the DVD drive, and upgrade ability if I am choosing a Macbook Air over Macbook Pro or a Thinkpad Machine? Who uses a drive more then 2 times a year these days? I don't and I think most of the Mac users don't. And if you ...


19

TextMate Doesn't address all of your needs but I think it's pretty snaz.


18

BBEdit by Bare Bones fulfills all of your requirements. Pricey but 100% worth it.


17

An editor that gets overlooked a lot is MacVim. It's based on the venerable vim editor, from *nix, and can do everything you asked via plugins. I show it supports 176-ish different languages, including all the ones you mentioned. I regularly do lookups of existing methods, variables, random text phrases via a CNTRL_N or CNTRL_P mapping which searches all ...


17

Dropbox Not programming related, but invaluable for everything that doesn't go in source control. While Evernote is document centric, Dropbox is file centric. If you need files on multiple computers with revision control then you need Dropbox.


17

Stuff that's Free: Burp Suite WiireShark ParosProxy NetTool LiveHTTPHeaders Safari WebInspector Network Tab FireBug Stuff that Costs: $1.99 - HTTPClient $15.00 - HTTP Scoop $50.00 - CharlesProxy


16

I use CharlesProxy, and while it isn't as scriptable as Fiddler, it does the job. And with single license key, you can run it on all OSes (it's written in Java). My needs were little different when I needed it ... I used it to debug webdav connections or to debug http communication between servers.


16

Use Command-K (⌘+K) to clear Safari 6 Web Inspector console.


14

Why choose the Macbook Air? Fast flash memory. (short boot time, support for Power Nap1,...) Slightly higher pixel density: 127 ppi vs2 113 ppi Less weight, smaller dimensions. Why not? Better color space coverage3 of the Macbook Pro display panel (78%-100% vs 56%-79%). I personally made the switch from a 15" MBP (2011) to a 13" MBA (2012) and I find ...


14

OS X Software for Editing XML EditX (commercial) EditX (free version) oXygen (commercial) XMLMate (free/open source plugin) for TextMate (shareware) XMPlify (beta)


13

To answer your question: Yes. When you install Xcode 4 (and its dev tools) your "old" Xcode folder gets renamed as Developer-old (provided you already had Xcode 3 installed) To answer Ricket: Xcode 4 doesn't support a few things (yet) like Plugins and some features (like assembly code) are non existent in Xcode4 (perhaps yet or never) so if you rely on some ...


13

Terminal The terminal on your Mac is a very useful tool for managing repositories if you don't want to go the graphical route. Additionally, many useful Objective-C libraries are hosted on Google Code or GitHub. Having Terminal means being able to check out copies of these libraries.


13

To elaborate on @Martín's answer, a MacBook is perfectly fine for development, I use one myself and never had issues. But you could improve it. Switching to 4GB of RAM would be first thing on the list. Using a second screen could also vastly improve this setup. Another (bigger) investment would be to buy a SSD.


13

If you are looking for Java development on the Mac, both NetBeans and Eclipse have a distribution for Mac OS X. Xcode also has support for Java, but it is not a Java-centric tool.


13

That depends on what your problems are with your mac and whether Linux solves them. Gotta give more detail than that, man. Personally, I love my mac for development for a few reasons: Window management is great. At work I have two decent monitors, but when I'm coding on my little 15" MBP, having cmd-tab/cmd-` is great and Exposé is a godsend. I have a ...


13

Inside the Eclipse.app is a setting for the font size. To make the fonts globally larger edit Eclipse.app » Contents » MacOS » eclipse.ini and remove the line -Dorg.eclipse.swt.internal.carbon.smallFonts from the file. Save the file and restart Eclipse.


13

A unix-ish package manager is clearly the way to go. I have moved from fink and Macports to homebrew, which has a recipe for cvs: brew install cvs For historical completeness, you formerly had to use the (slightly hard to find) recipe for cvs: brew install homebrew/dupes/cvs. After only very minimal testing, it seems to work.


13

Here is the OS X Yosemite v10.10 Documentation. You can always find developer resources on the Apple Developer sites. You can find other OS X documentations there, as well as iOS documentations. Other resources, such as feature descriptions, revision histories, upcoming changes, and user agreements can be found there, also. The best of luck in your ...


12

There are two programs that I am aware of which will easily allow you to configure your Mac to send email from the command line. I have written up HOWTOs for both of them: mailsend msmtp Of the two, I suggest msmtp. Configuration is complicated enough that I'm not sure if I should replicate all of the steps here, but I will mention that if you use ...


11

mail -s subject someone@example.com type your message, press Ctrl+D to finish


11

You can download older versions of Xcode here after you've logged into the dev center. Uncheck all of the options except "Developer Tools" in the Categories section on the left side of the page. Every version of Xcode back to version 1.0 in 2003 is available there.


11

The easiest way for most programs is to install with a package manager like Macports, Homebrew or Fink. The porters will have worked out the issues about porting the code to OSX so it should be as simple as follows (for Macports) Install macports, download the .pkg file and run it Install Xcode and its command line tools Add /opt/local/bin to your path - ...


10

Xcode 6 currently requires an active iOS or Mac Developer Program membership, available from developer.apple.com/programs, as Xcode 6 and Swift is not publicly available yet. Once Xcode 6 is out of beta / prerelease anyone should be able to download it from the MAS, but that is speculation based on past experience and not something Apple has announced.


10

The devices tab is now a new screen. Use for Development no longer exists. The option in Window → Devices or ⇧⌘2. From that window you could enable devices for development by adding your provisioning profiles. Right click on device and select Show Provisioning Profiles.... It will appear a window where you can add your profiles. After that you will be ...


10

Kaleidoscope A great diff/merge tool. Can compare images. Integrates seamlessly with almost anything.


10

XCode 3.x (and possibly 4.x when it's released) will definitely work on that Macbook. I have an old white Macbook 2.4 Core 2 Duo with 2GB of RAM and it works. Compared to the 8 Core Mac Pro, it's really slow, but it's fast enough to use it and do things with it. If you want to compile a big and complex project, it will of course take longer, but other than ...



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