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22

The current low level Mac Mini with an upgrade to 4GB memory is probably the best bang for your buck. That's what I have except with 8GB; got my memory from Amazon for $130, cheaper than Apple memory. It's a very capable machine. If you use a lot of programs simultaneously, the standard 2GB is kinda cramped, but 4GB would do fine; it just seemed like a good ...


22

I actually think the idea of a single, unified, development environment like what you're after is somewhat antithetical to OS X design principles. One of the great things I've found, since switching to OS X for development work about a year ago, is that many OS X application developers share my own personal philosophy when it comes to software: do less, but ...


18

TextMate Doesn't address all of your needs but I think it's pretty snaz.


18

You'll do just fine with a MacBook Air, at least, that's what I'd go for (and I'm in love with the Air as well :)) I will miss the DVD drive, and upgrade ability if I am choosing a Macbook Air over Macbook Pro or a Thinkpad Machine? Who uses a drive more then 2 times a year these days? I don't and I think most of the Mac users don't. And if you ...


17

Dropbox Not programming related, but invaluable for everything that doesn't go in source control. While Evernote is document centric, Dropbox is file centric. If you need files on multiple computers with revision control then you need Dropbox.


16

BBEdit by Bare Bones fulfills all of your requirements. Pricey but 100% worth it.


15

An editor that gets overlooked a lot is MacVim. It's based on the venerable vim editor, from *nix, and can do everything you asked via plugins. I show it supports 176-ish different languages, including all the ones you mentioned. I regularly do lookups of existing methods, variables, random text phrases via a CNTRL_N or CNTRL_P mapping which searches all ...


15

Use Command-K (⌘+K) to clear Safari 6 Web Inspector console.


15

I use CharlesProxy, and while it isn't as scriptable as Fiddler, it does the job. And with single license key, you can run it on all OSes (it's written in Java). My needs were little different when I needed it ... I used it to debug webdav connections or to debug http communication between servers.


13

Stuff that's Free: Burp Suite WiireShark ParosProxy NetTool LiveHTTPHeaders Safari WebInspector Network Tab FireBug Stuff that Costs: $1.99 - HTTPClient $15.00 - HTTP Scoop $50.00 - CharlesProxy


13

Why choose the Macbook Air? Fast flash memory. (short boot time, support for Power Nap1,...) Slightly higher pixel density: 127 ppi vs2 113 ppi Less weight, smaller dimensions. Why not? Better color space coverage3 of the Macbook Pro display panel (78%-100% vs 56%-79%). I personally made the switch from a 15" MBP (2011) to a 13" MBA (2012) and I find ...


13

To elaborate on @Martín's answer, a MacBook is perfectly fine for development, I use one myself and never had issues. But you could improve it. Switching to 4GB of RAM would be first thing on the list. Using a second screen could also vastly improve this setup. Another (bigger) investment would be to buy a SSD.


13

If you are looking for Java development on the Mac, both NetBeans and Eclipse have a distribution for Mac OS X. Xcode also has support for Java, but it is not a Java-centric tool.


13

That depends on what your problems are with your mac and whether Linux solves them. Gotta give more detail than that, man. Personally, I love my mac for development for a few reasons: Window management is great. At work I have two decent monitors, but when I'm coding on my little 15" MBP, having cmd-tab/cmd-` is great and Exposé is a godsend. I have a ...


13

To answer your question: Yes. When you install Xcode 4 (and its dev tools) your "old" Xcode folder gets renamed as Developer-old (provided you already had Xcode 3 installed) To answer Ricket: Xcode 4 doesn't support a few things (yet) like Plugins and some features (like assembly code) are non existent in Xcode4 (perhaps yet or never) so if you rely on some ...


13

Terminal The terminal on your Mac is a very useful tool for managing repositories if you don't want to go the graphical route. Additionally, many useful Objective-C libraries are hosted on Google Code or GitHub. Having Terminal means being able to check out copies of these libraries.


11

OS X Software for Editing XML EditX (commercial) EditX (free version) oXygen (commercial) XMLMate (free/open source plugin) for TextMate (shareware) XMPlify (beta)


11

You can download XCode 3.2.6 here after you've logged into the dev center.


10

XCode 3.x (and possibly 4.x when it's released) will definitely work on that Macbook. I have an old white Macbook 2.4 Core 2 Duo with 2GB of RAM and it works. Compared to the 8 Core Mac Pro, it's really slow, but it's fast enough to use it and do things with it. If you want to compile a big and complex project, it will of course take longer, but other than ...


10

Kaleidoscope A great diff/merge tool. Can compare images. Integrates seamlessly with almost anything.


10

Xcode 6 currently requires an active iOS or Mac Developer Program membership, available from developer.apple.com/programs, as Xcode 6 and Swift is not publicly available yet. Once Xcode 6 is out of beta / prerelease anyone should be able to download it from the MAS, but that is speculation based on past experience and not something Apple has announced.


9

Yes. From the doc 'About Xcode and iOS SDK.pdf': By default, Xcode 4 installs in the folder /Developer - but if you wish to install it in a different folder, allowing it to co-exist with previous Xcode 3.2 installations, you can change this location. You do this by selecting "Custom Install" The doc gives detailed instructions.


9

First off he's wrong on all levels. The Desktop Version is $29, the Server Version is $500. A standard Mac Mini is $700 base. Mac Mini Server is $1000 base. Second, the distributions are pretty much identical. The difference is that the Server Version ships the server applications, tools, and processes. Postfix, Dovecot, Jabberd2, OpenLDAP, the entirety of ...


9

MacPorts has several pre-configured gcc packages (from 4.2 to 4.6). Just install MacPorts and run sudo port install gcc46


8

I need to learn proper xattr usage. Apparently, xattr has a "clear" (-c) command that can be applied using a wildcard (*), as follows, xattr -cr * This results in a recursive removal of all ._AppleDouble files from the current folder on down (the -r flag does recursive, while the -c flag clears them), thus making the process a trivial one line command. ...


8

These are both free and haven't been mentioned so far. I found that both of these are far superior to the X11 Wireshark. Cocoa Packet Analyzer Packet Peeper


8

Nope, you have to use a Mac. All the tools are on the Mac, as is the simulator program you'll need to test in. Even if you could somehow finagle the whole thing running in Windows you still need a Mac to submit to Apple to get it on the App Store. Cheapest scenario you're looking $699 for a Mac Mini and $99 for the iOS Developer Program (which you won't ...


8

Xcode was good for your job. If you want use NetBeans and Eclipse on your Mac, you can download them, too, because they have OS X distributions. Eclipse Netbeans



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