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19

This happens because the LaunchServices database gets corrupted. To fix on Mountain Lion: Open Terminal.app in the /Applications/Utilities/ folder. run /System/Library/Frameworks/CoreServices.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/LaunchServices.framework/Versions/A/Support/lsregister -kill -r -domain local -domain system -domain user Restart This command has ...


18

Chealion answered this on SuperUser. I won't copy and paste his answer here, as he got the credit not me. But basically, what you could do is (quoted from Chealion's answer) : A second method of arranging the Windows so you can see them (if for some reason they're staying off screen) is to change to the application that owns the window in question, hold ...


18

It's not that the icon is sideways, it's that the small thumbnail for the file that's used as the icon needs to be wide because the CSV file has at least one really long line of data in it. The thumbnail you're seeing is a dynamic preview of the contents of the file and in the case of the file on the top of the image, the data contents demand a lot of ...


16

Restarting the Dock seems to work for me, however I don't know what is causing this grey desktop background. To restart the Dock, type this into Terminal and press enter: killall Dock


11

In the terminal, do this: defaults write com.apple.finder CreateDesktop -bool false && killall Finder After this, there'll be nothing on your Desktop (but still in ~/Desktop, i.e. your Desktop Folder). It'll look like this: Beautiful, isn't it? If you want to change it back: defaults write com.apple.finder CreateDesktop -bool true && ...


10

Out of the box there is no themeing capability in Mac OS X, you can however modify some of the colours used by Mac OS X in the Appearance Preference Pane in System Preferences. If you're serious about themeing however there are 3rd party applications you can get to help with this: CandyBar - manages and changes icons. ThemePark - does most everything ...


8

There's no built-in feature in OSX for that but there are two applications that can do that for you, Hyperspaces and SpaceSuit.


8

They're in /Library/Desktop Pictures/


8

Pressing the shortcuts for changing desktops while dragging a window should still work, but the shortcuts have to be enabled in System Preferences. SizeUp supports for example assigning ⌃⇧→ to moving a window to the next desktop.


8

This is a very wide reaching question, but to answer the central theme, the rough equivalent of explorer.exe on Windows is the Finder application. Finder is the only application you cannot remove from your dock, mainly because it is the finder that runs the dock etc, much like explorer.exe runs the taskbars etc in Windows (I think I got that right for ...


7

Firstly, @cyphorious has the answer you need, but I'm going to add more details to help expand your understanding of Mac terms Firstly, the .app file that is on your desktop, is the actual application, not a link. Think of a .app as being roughly equivalent to a .exe (the main different being that a windows .exe file is a single file that will no doubt ...


7

You can do this by opening iMessage or Messages on your MBP. Then going to Messages->Preferences There is an option in here to remove it from your menu bar Hope this helps :)


6

I don't understand how this: Hey I just started using Mac and would really like to get in depth detail about mac OS . connects to this: I tried disabling the desktop functionality- disabling the dock and other features as right click context menu on desktop etc. If you want to start learning how to use OS X, then why would you want to start by ...


6

Try opening Terminal, type killall Dock and press return. Dock controls the desktop background in Lion. If it's still grey after that, try rm ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.desktop then killall Dock


6

Since Snow Leopard the hard drives aren't shown on the Desktop by default. However if you upgraded from Leopard or earlier it does honor the original settings. However, some updates will disable this setting during the upgrade. Have a look under Finder preferences and make sure the Hard Disk box is ticked.


6

You can use View -> Slideshow to do this in Preview


6

Mac OS X Lion supports this out of the box now. Simply switch to the Space you want to apply a certain background to, then change it as usual (with System Preferences or the desktop's context menu). Repeat for your other Spaces and background images. For older versions, you will still need to use a third-party tool as recommended by the other answers.


6

Go into Finder, then go to the menu bar and click Finder -> Preferences. Select the "General" tab and check "Hard disks" under "Show these items on the desktop":


6

If you can't launch or switch programs (I find Spotlight is a good way to do this if everything else is hanging, just hit ⌘Space, but it may not work in your case), you could enable SSH access ahead of time, and then use another device to log in and check what's hogging your CPU. Open Sharing Preferences and enable Remote Login. Then you can connect via SSH ...


6

You can add a .command extension to your text script. Then use chmod 744 to make it executable. When opened or double-clicked in the Finder it will then run from the Terminal.


6

You can disable it in System Preferences:


6

Apart from the obvious risk of significant damage from drops and what not (which you seem to have taken precaution against), the only real vibration prone component of computers is generally the hard drive. When a hard drive is shaken to violently, there is a risk that the read/write head will touch, scratch, and damage the spinning platter. However, in ...


6

The journaled file system practically eliminates the chances that the filesystem itself will be in an inconsistent state after the next reboot. But "consistent" is not the same as "correct". Before journaling, the filesystem structures themselves could become damaged which could lead to more corruption occurring after the next boot. So journaling limits ...


5

Reputable sources like Macworld indicate that the Finder draws non-generic Desktop icons the same way it draws open windows, and the more of them there are, the more memory and processor time it takes to refresh the Desktop. I have not found any sources that indicate this is a major factor in system speed, but yes, more custom icons on the Desktop take more ...


5

Try this on Terminal: cd ~/Desktop ln -s ~/Library/path/to/folder


5

This is normal behavior when the desktop has no particular order or arrangement specified. Try going to the Finder and setting a "Sort By" option. Go to the Finder and click on the desktop. Click View > Sort By from the menu bar Then try selecting an option other than "None" with in the "Sort By" Menu.


5

For completeness: From my answer originally at Server Fault Question 7237: When a monitor is unplugged (including the adapter as well if applicable - leaving the adapter leaves OS X thinking the monitor is still plugged in) all the Windows should move onto your main screen. Occasionally some windows (eg. Firefox) will keep their position on the very far ...


5

Open the folder. Select All. Copy. Click on the Desktop. Paste. Delete the folder.


5

This should work for you: osascript tell application "Finder" set desktop picture to POSIX file "/Library/Desktop Pictures/Solid Colors/Solid Gray Dark.png" end tell There are several other ways on this Mac Rumors thread, but his way is the easiest.


5

I would suggest you set up a hot corner to show the desktop (this is what I do): Open System Preferences Click Mission Control Click the "Hot Corners..." button at the bottom Set the corner you want to use for "Desktop" (I use the top right) Click OK Now you can move a file from a Finder window to the desktop with just the mouse: Click and drag the ...



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