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14

I have one hard drive connected to my iMac for use with Time Machine. In addition to the Time Machine backup, I maintain a bootable clone of my iMac's hard drive using SuperDuper. The hard drive with the bootable backup is stored at my in-laws' house (you could just as easily store it at a friend's house or at work). The off-site clone is updated once a ...


12

On Snow Leopard, you would need to boot from an external OS to wipe the drive. On Mountain Lion (or Lion), the system makes a recovery HD so you can self-wipe the Mac. This is a much, much faster and easier task, so I recommend you upgrade first and then do the wiping using a recovery boot and Disk Utility. I personally would do these steps (and you could ...


11

I would try using rsync from the command line. rsync -av --ignore-errors /Volumes/failingDrive/ /Volumes/brandNewDrive should do the trick. Mind the trailing / at the end of the source. Rsync will not copy files it finds on the destination, so if you call it a second time it will continue where it left off.


10

First step, use a low level tool like dd to make an image of the drive as it exists now, and then stop using the drive. Every second that drive spends connected to a computer (especially a Mac) is a chance for something new to be written to it on top of data you want to recover. All of your recovery attempts should be performed on the image that you make. ...


9

From the Apple Support pages Securely erasing a disk To securely erase a disk or partition: In Disk Utility, select the disk or partition to erase, and then click Erase. Specify a format, and enter a name for the disk. Click Security Options and choose to write over the data once, 7 times, or 35 times. Click OK. Click Erase. Writing ...


9

rsync (from Terminal) has an option for that (--ignore-errors). However crafting the right command line arguments may be somewhat complicated. A nice rsync GUI is Carbon Copy Cloner (donationware) After you are satisfied with the cloning setting, launch clone in CCC and immediately after run from terminal ps axuww| grep rsync and you will see the right ...


8

As current hard drive-oriented techniques for file sanitization are ineffective on SSDs, I recommend to encrypt the whole hard drive using Filevault 2 (best if you did this before you put your data onto it). (This is only possible in Lion, Filevault 1 in older versions of MacOS will only encrypt your home folder.) This way you will not erase your data, but ...


8

You do not like the cloud - yet, I will suggest online backup solutions for a worst-case-scenario, because I believe that they're the most reliable. better data retention and preservation, after all your hard disk is prone to data loss since it's a magnetic device online backups are not prone to house robbery since they are stored in a different location ...


7

I use cp -Rfv sourcefile destinationfile with success on a pretty regular basis. cp = copy R = maintains file hierarchies f = if an existing destination file cannot be opened, remove it and try again v = verbose mode, displays files transferred as it progresses sourcefile = data you want to copy destinationfile = directory/drive you want to copy to


7

If you're comfortable using the terminal, you might be able to figure out what the file is. If you're not comfortable using terminal, I wouldn't worry about doing this. I was doing this mainly for my own interest rather than any real need. Open terminal and enter the following commands (enter the text following the $): $ cd /lost+found $ ls -l total ...


6

Absolutely! I plan for the worse! As a first level of defence I'm running Time Machine against all my important files. Photos and videos. Things I wouldn't want to lose. This gives me some "stupidity insurance" -- if I delete something accidentally, hopefully I can get it back from a Time Machine snapshot. I also push all my data out to the cloud. I'm a ...


6

While I never tried it myself, in theory you could use something like PhoneDisk to open the app's private folder and copy all the content to your computer. Then, after deleting and reinstalling the app, you should be able to copy the content back.


6

HFS Plus (HFS+) is a fragile and a little outdated filesystem. If you google it, you'll find many reports of filesystem corruption. Rebooting without unmounting the filesystem is the best way to corrupt it. This happens when the mac freezes for some reason (in my case it's the nvidia video card) or power failures. Here are some tips, that IMHO should lower ...


6

You can use the terminal to do this. The following command should work: find /path/to/the/folder \ -name "*.jpg" \ -exec bash -c "sips -g pixelHeight -g pixelWidth {} | grep -E ' [12]?[0-9]{0,2}$' >/dev/null" \;\ -print That command will find all JPEG files under /path/to/the/folder which have a width or a height of between 1 and 299 pixels. ...


5

There is little hope unless one or both of the editors squirrel away copies of the file for you or embed the undo buffer in the document. It really depends on the editors and the settings. One last ditch effort is to use the mdfind command. If that file had a memorable string or misspelling you could see in an instant if any files on the disk contain that ...


5

Which iPhone OS and model do you have? The newer ones encrypt the data and the erase deletes the key. The chances of DIY recovery are slim. If you pull it off, you probably can get hired for iPhone forensics and make some serious salary doing that professionally. Older devices are more amenable to typical recovery efforts. Either way you will need a ...


5

SSDs don't come in an 80GB size (that I've seen -- usually multiples of 32GB). It may be possible depending on why the drive dies. If its a mechanical failure, then you could take the drive to a specialty computer repair shop (try local before the big stores), and they should be able to help you with diagnosing the actual issue. Since the data is stored ...


5

If you are comfortable using the command line, you could use dd to copy your drive byte-for-byte. First, you need to find the BSD identifier for your internal drive. If you are booted from the drive, this will be disk0. Otherwise, it is most likely disk1, but you should run the following command to see all of your disks and the partitions they contain. ...


4

You might try using Target Disk Mode - hold down T at startup and then connect the MacBook Pro to another Mac (or a PC that can read Mac drives) via FireWire or Thunderbolt. Or try holding down the Shift key to boot into Safe Boot mode. If neither of those work, try booting from your MacBook Pro's system restore DVD, use Disk Utility and try repairing the ...


4

Text Messages are stored in a Database format, and not as individual files. It's unlikely that they will ever be "overwritten" in the sense you ask, but may well remain in the database tables either forever, or until such regular purge mechanism clears them out on a schedule. Depending on your OS version, you may be able to open and inspect the files. See ...


4

This applies to .docx files: Create a back-up copy of the file Change the extension from .docx to .zip Open new .zip file Extract all files In the extracted folder, navigate to word\settings.xml Open settings.xml Remove the tag w:documentProtection, don't forget to include the < and /> Save file Copy to modified settings.xml to the actual .zip file ...


4

I successfully used TestDisk to get photos back from an SD card.


4

If you backup with iTunes and you restored from the backup and the notes were gone, then there is no where to retrieve them from unless you have another backup that contains those notes. Launch iTunes on the computer and go to iTunes>Preferences>Devices. You will see a window with all of your backups listed in it. If you see a recent backup that you are ...


4

Photos are not stored on a particular sector on your hard drive, the sectors are maintained by the operating system and the hard drive itself. I would suggest scanning the entire drive for deleted files as your best chance of finding the files you are looking for.


4

File in lost+found are fragments of files that have been found by a disk repair job (usually ran through disk utility). A more clear explanation in this thread. Extract: If you run fsck, the filesystem check and repair command, it might find data fragments that are not referenced anywhere in the filesystem. In particular, fsck might find data that looks ...


4

After some deep investigations we come to the preliminary conclusion that the culprit wasn't any malware but an unhappy coincidence involving org.macosforge.xquartz.startx.plist, .bashrc and an xrd --merge ~/.Xdefaults command. Since all those files were deleted, we don't have hard evidence though. Said .bashrc is derived from a (Linux-)precursor. It was ...


3

If I was in the same or similar situation, this is what I'd try... Using another Mac I'd download Yosemite from the App Store and then create a USB Installer. Next I'd boot the Mac with the Yosemite USB Installer and install Yosemite to an External USB Drive, preferably a USB 3.0 HDD/SSD or even a large Thumb Drive. Once the install to the External USB ...


3

If you quit TextEdit, then reopening TextEdit will re-open all your documents. If it didn't give you an option to save, then they were stored by Restore in the Saved Application State. When you next open the app, they should have been there as the application state is restored. If this did not occur, then something else went wrong and the application state ...


3

The Apple installer does not erase the disk unless you tell it to - that involves opening Disk Utility. So your files are fairly likely to still be there in the Users folder, just under your old user name. However, you said "She used the installation CD" - you have old hardware running OS X.6 (Snow Leopard) or earlier? those versions DID have an "erase and ...


3

You can try this but please make sure you backup first: Boot to single-user mode, hold down the command (i.e. cloverleaf or Apple) and "s" keys as the system begins to boot. To Debug, Repair, Force (and fix errors automatically) /sbin/fsck_hfs -drfy /dev/disk0s2 To scan for bad blocks: /sbin/fsck_hfs -S /dev/disk0s2 Assuming disk0s2 is the one you ...



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