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If you can at least start the Mac up and make the battery lights flash, it's lint. Here's how you clean lint from a port: Get a toothpick. Stick it in the port. Carefully rub the inside of the port. Pull out the toothpick. Repeat.


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Apple makes 3 different chargers for their MacBooks that you need to be concerned about: 45-Watt -- For MacBook Airs. 60-Watt -- For 13" MacBook Pros. 85-Watt -- For 15" and 17" MacBook Pros. You can use a higher-wattage charger than you MacBook requires, but not a lower-wattage one. Yours was an 85-watt charger. If your friend's charger was a 60-watt, ...


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This has been happening to me for over a year.. I wrapped my special cord in electric tape because it was falling apart. I have no idea why that's the only cord that will charge my phone. We have 4 extra lightning cables from apple and none of them work with my phone but they all work perfectly with my husband's. My special cable can charge his phone as ...


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Just go to system preferences and go to display and turn on power nap. Then go to the top left apple and plug in device and click sleep on the apple menu. It should still charge but it only works with the 2012 or later models of mac or iMac or Mac air or any mac really.


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Yes, at least for the iPhone 6S using the Apple USB-C to Lighning 2m cable. I just started using it this week with mine and haven't had any issues. For a few years I've charged my iPhone with an iPad charger. Not sure if the 29W charger is faster, but at least it seems just as fast. Also, I heard in a podcast about videos warning about USB-C to USB ...


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You could try, charging and uncharging it a few times, it might help. But I wouldn't really rely on that. I bought a replacement battery for my iPhone 5 via iFixit and I am really happy with it - it shouldn't be much more than 1/4 of the price you named. So make sure you don't get an extra cheap one of eBay, those won't make you happy for long.


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It is totally safe. A Lightning Cable is like a powered USB. In the worst case (an iPad), it's 5 V (and 12 W), far from enough for damaging your children. The fact that if the part touching is more sensible it doesn't mean more damage. Still, if the body part that touches the connectors is more conducting, they might feel a tiny "shock", but more like when ...


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You should be more concerned about the brick (the one that plugs in to the outlet) rather than the lightning cable itself. Check the output amperage or wattage, the higher the value, the more "shock" you'll get. For iOS devices, those values are quite low. You'll get a shock (more like a surprise), but not severe.


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It should be very safe, if not harmless, for your children. Reason being, the lightning connector puts a charge though at 5V with a negligible amount of amperage (not going to break out the ammeter to find out). What causes electric shocks is the amperage, the higher the more lethal. As mentioned in the thread, the amount of volts helps the charge travel ...



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