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18

When the phone operating system is off, the hardware still remains sensitive to the introduction of charging power to the 30 pin dock connector. Not only does this help in cases where the OS has frozen and run down the battery past the point where available voltage can even run the system (including the charging circuitry) but it also helps in the more ...


10

From MagSafe Wikipedia page Pin 1 - Ground Pin 2 - V+ @ 16.5 V DC Pin 3 - Charge control pin Pin 4 - V+ @ 16.5 V DC Pin 5 - Ground The inner large pins are V+ (16.5 VDC). Measuring with no load will give 6.86 V DC; the full 16.5 V is provided to the proper load. The outer large pins are ground. The tiny center pin is a charge control pin that assists ...


9

In my case, the problem was the temperature of the charger. Since it's currently winter in the southern hemisphere, removing the MacBook from charge causes the charger to cool down (since it apparently draws very little mains power when there is no load on the MacBook side). At some point when it is cool enough, it will refuse to supply power when the ...


7

Yes this is fine (assuming you refer to the 60W Magsafe) and this has been confirmed by Apple to be safe Although you should always use the proper wattage adapter for your Apple portable, you can use an adapter of a higher wattage without issue.


5

Your mileage may vary. Most 3rd-party accessories use inferior parts or less rigorous quality assurance. They may work, they may not. Paying the extra $10 for the official Apple charger is probably worth it, when weighed against the risk of buying a new iPhone. Plus, any issues with official accessories will be covered by the warranty. Basically, it's hit ...


5

Most of the third party iPhone ones are mostly safe most of the time. However there isn't a good way to tell which ones aren't. Here is a teardown of an Apple one and a clone. I say most of the time since some of the safety issues are only problems if there are faults. But in a poorly designed one, faults can cause fire and/or shock. Also poorly designed ...


5

The short answer is: there's a better chance you want your phone ON than OFF. That's why Apple chose to make it turn on whenever there's a power source available.


5

You can use it, but how much actual charging goes on may be minimal. It depends how much power your MBP is drawing (i.e. if you're doing CPU or graphics intensive tasks, you'll draw more power, thus less charging), but I suspect the 45W won't do much more than slow the rate of battery drain. If your MBP is asleep or turned off, it should charge the battery, ...


5

The physical MagSafe adapter remains unchanged from a pinout perspective (the shape has altered externally from a T shape to an L shape and back again) for almost every Macbook except the 2012 Macbook Air and Retina Macbook which use MagSafe 2; Adapters are available to connect a MagSafe power supply to these machines, but you cannot use a MagSafe 2 adapter ...


4

The battery is no where near that part - it's in the hand rest portion of the computer. Also, lithium polymer batteries don't really ooze liquids that would travel that far inside the computer, so it's probably the result of a spill near that area or just corrosion (rust) of the contact once the plastic covering has worn away. However, any liquid or ...


4

There really isn't any difference, there is no chance of anything bad happening regardless, although if you were particularly worried about this sort of thing, then frankly you would be better to turn the charger unit off at the wall socket first, after which it is utterly irrelevant (assuming you are using a wall charger). If you are charging from a PC ...


4

Yes. The wattage ratings are maximum and all iOS devices will only pull the current they need to charge. Should a device or an adapter get too hot to operate safely, they will shut off.


3

While an iPad typically charges very slowly on a regular USB port, you could still use your MacBook Pro's USB ports to charge your devices. You definitely can charge your iPhone using your computer's USB port. There also exists an accessory to "plug" a 10W USB port onto your MacBook Pro power adapter called PlugBug. This should be fine for charging your ...


3

The original Apple charger has an output limited to 2.1 A at 5.1 V. I occasionally charge my iPad 2 Wifi with the old charger of my passed Palm Pre. It provides an amperage of 1 A at standard 5 V USB voltage. I don't know if you can go even lower than 1 A, but the standard USB amperage of .5 A is not enough to charge it. It shouldn't be a problem to get a ...


3

Also note that a Pro with a completely discharged battery will not be able to start up off a 45W or 60W adapter at first - I know from first-hand experience that a 60W can charge a 15" Pro's battery enough after a few minutes to allow booting.


2

I have had something like this with an older MacBook. With Magsafe you can get small particles attracted - iron or steel filings, or even the small percentage in normal urban dust, given time. Combined with temperature change, and humidity, such particles can start to corrode: that is, rust. This may discolour the connector. If it wipes off there ...


2

It's not a bug, it's just because the GPS app is using much more power then the charger can deliver. You should check the amp. of your charger. I have one of 2100 mA and I can use my iPad with Navigon while my iPad is charging. This charger sold in the Apple Store will provide your iPhone enough power to both run the GPS app and charge at the same time.


2

Input Voltage 100V-240V AC Frequency: 50/60Hz Wattage: 0.45A Output Voltage : 5V DC Current: up to 2A Wattage: up to 10W


2

A standard USB charge should be enough to charge it, albeit very slowly. It's important to note on a very low charge like this, often it will provide enough to either a) charge when the screen is of, or b) not charge but allow enough to run it without any change in charge levels. In this mode, the charging indicator will always show not charging, as by ...


2

Anandtech has some nice charts detailing the wattage of the iPhone 4S running various apps, which could be a good starting point for you. You may also want to check out existing kits/projects, such as MintyBoost - they seem to work reasonably well with iPhones. There's a specific MintyBoost page detailing Apple device charging that may also yield some ...


2

The USB-to-30-pin-dock cables are electrically identical. All of them can carry enough charging current for both devices. The same is not true for the power sources as the iPad gets a 10W supply and the rest 5W. What power source are you using with the cables? iPads need more power than most USB ports offer to charge with the screen on.


2

I actually have the same problem but a different solution worked for me: The problem only arose when I unplugged the charger from the MacBook (but not from the power supply) and plugged it back in. Unplugging the charger from the power supply for a moment solved the issue instantly.


2

This will not affect the Mac at all. It will not charge faster. It will not damage your battery. It will not damage your adapter. Information on power adapters is detailed on Apple's support site: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2346


2

Nope. The iDevice charger has a very limited power output that would be insufficent for running the macbook, let alone charging it. Going the other way around, however, is a little more doable, an adaptor could be made, but at that point you may as well just plug your iDevice into your macbook's usb port and be done with it.


2

Assuming that the wall socket is providing power (or the switch for the socket is on) it is normal, or rather common, for power adapters of devices to be a bit warm when connected to the wall socket (mains) without a device connected to the other end (iPad, iPhone, laptop, etc.). In many cases, the charger would be considerably warmer while actively charging ...


1

It really doesn't matter, either way is fine.


1

Sadly you are out of luck, but it was a good idea! Apple transitioned fully to charging over USB only, although for a while both Firewire and USB charging were an option. This caused a bit of a row when it happened, because for years 3rd party manufacturers for charging docks and speaker docks etc never bothered to update their designs to use USB when ...


1

I happen to have a C8 plug from my PS Vita charger, and my iPad (3rd gen) charger here. I plugged them into each other, and plugged in my iPhone. Sure enough, it started charging my phone. So yes, this does work fine. C8 plugs will plug into the iPad 3 chargers.


1

Are all third party chargers safe? No - not even close. Are all third party chargers unsafe? Same answer. If you use a charger somewhere where it won't start a fire and you can afford to replace a damaged phone / iPad if it comes to that then I'd say it's worth it to take into account your familiarity with electronics and perhaps decide to get a third ...


1

You can use one charger for both the iPad and the iPhone and another one for the MacBook one charger for the MacBook and then (slowly) charge the iDevices via the MacBook



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