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84

If you're just looking for the Unicode versions of Mac OS X keys, you can use this site to copy and paste them from the text box. More generally, Mac OS X provides a pane to insert special characters. You'll typically find it under Edit -> Special Characters in any program that takes text input. The Command key symbol can be found under Symbols -> Technical ...


40

There are some important gotchas with the other solutions posted here. For one, symbol and text substitution entries only work in Cocoa apps. If you want a truly system-wide solution that works in all applications, this is not an option. Also, apps like KeyRemap4MacBook are great, but relying on them means you have to keep the app running in the background ...


18

I also found it hard to find a straight answer for this, so I just went into System Preferences > Language & Text > Text and created a use symbol and text substitution option where when I type (cmd) it replaces it with the command symbol.


13

If you can enter the ² and ³ once, you can put it in as a substitution in System Preferences, Language & Text -> Text. Put something unique on the left side, like ^^2, then paste your symbol in on the right. You'll may have to quit & restart each application for it to work, and some applications it may not work correctly in. Any that use a web view ...


13

In Character Viewer, click the gear icon in the top-left, then select "Customize List". In the dialog that appears, scroll to the bottom and check "Unicode" under the "Code Tables" branch. You should see something like this if you click on the "Unicode" item that's now in the left-hand pane (with unicode hex values down the left-hand column): ...


11

The "~" key is located between the "left shift" and "Z" keys on the international english keyboard. Many users are used to have this key under the escape key (the US layout), and they (including me) use the KeyRemap4MacBook software to swap those keys.


11

An updated answer for Lion and above: You can also type ^ ⌘ <space> to bring up the characters menu, then start typing to search, and search for place of interest, then press enter to start selecting them, then tab to the correct result, then enter again to insert it. Sounds like a lot, but it can really be narrowed down to ^ ⌘ <space> pla ...


8

Font Book does in fact have a view that displays all glyphs provided by a font — just select Preview - Repertoire on the menu bar: You can also get a preview of a font using Quick Look: select a font file (from /Library/Fonts) and press space.


7

These are U+fb01 and fb02, Latin Small Ligature Fl and Fi. They are in Unicode really only because they were contained in legacy 8 bit character sets like MacRoman, but should no longer be used for anything. In modern technology such ligatures are created by fonts on the basis of the underlying codes for the separate characters, which is what should aways ...


6

The character palette simply gives you access to the characters in the fonts on your system. To add something to it, you need to create a font with that character in it or add the character to an existing font. Common font creation tools for OS X are Fontlab and Fontforge. There are also some online services that may work (use Google to find them).


5

I don't know if it's the easiest way, but here's one way: In the "International" system preferences, turn on the keyboard layout called "Unicode Hex Input". When you need to type a prime, type commandspace to switch to this keyboard layout, and then hold down option and type 2 0 3 2. For double prime, it's 2 0 3 3.


5

Using the Character Viewer, search for "Prime". You can then click "Add to Favorites" for more convenient access. In Mavericks, the following shortcut is helpful to bring up the character viewer: Control + Command + Spacebar Click the button in the top right corner to switch between the "Characters" window and "Character Viewer". Note: to get that ...


4

That would be an emoji. You can insert them anywhere by clicking Edit > Special Characters > Emoji. The beer one is under the Objects subcategory.


4

Han characters are unified in Unicode. Display of the Chinese vs Japanese version depends on the font. In OS X, the default font should normally be determined by the order of these two languages in the system preferences language list. Make sure that Chinese is higher than Japanese on your list and restart. It's possible some apps might not follow that ...


4

If you have TextExpander, one can also make a snippet for it, ala Dr. Drang. He also has a Keyboard Library with snippets for a host of keyboard symbols available.


4

You can also add Your favourite characters to "press and hold" key behaviour. Here's explanation how to do it on apple stackexchange: How to add characters to the press and hold character picker in OS X Lion? Keep in mind that this is done inside System directory, so be careful and remember that there's a chance of losing Your setup after upgrading the ...


4

Viewing Special Characters The good news is that this part should almost always 'just work' on OS X and iOS devices. Encodings are usually handled intelligently, Unicode fonts are installed, and font substitution does its job. If you do encounter problems, be sure to specify the encoding as Unicode (UTF-8) when saving. If your text editor doesn't allow you ...


4

To type this character, type ⌥+E, then ⇧+E. "É" is the character I get. In Lion, I understand one can hold down the key, a la iOS, and get a list of possible characters with accents for many of the keys:


4

French layout? Press caps lock ⇪. Press the é key (that's the 2 on a QWERTY). Press caps lock ⇪ again. But you need to make sure you're using the French layout, and not French - numeric (“Français - numérique”, French flag with “123” beneath it). Otherwise, you're explicitly asking the system to use the caps lock key as a shift lock for the numbers ...


4

They are called ligatures and they are from the days of metal typesetting. 2 letters that commonly occurred together would be forged as one piece of metal type. Nowadays on the computer, they are sometimes included in fonts, in order to make a more pleasing letter group. They are not special characters, really it is just supposed to be letters f and i drawn ...


3

Option/alt + ñ on the Spanish ISO layout, followed by a or o gives you ã and õ. To make a custom layout, use Ukelele http://scripts.sil.org/ukelele PS If you are running 10.7, you can also get those characters by holding down the a and o keys until the Character Picker popup menu appears.


3

If you open the Font Variation section of Character Viewer and set Collections to "Containing selected character" it will show all of the fonts that have the character and how they'll display, as shown here:


3

After you choose the character go to the Font Variation section you might need to click on the triangle at its left side to expand this. This shows the fonts that include the glyph.


3

With the document open, place the cursor where you want the symbol, Open the Character Viewer as described above. Type "Place of Interest" in the character viewer search field. It shows up on at the bottom of the window. Double click it and it shows up where you placed your cursor. Save it to your favorites in the Character Viewer window to make it easier to ...


3

They are mathematical alphanumeric characters, which look like glyph variants of basic Latin letters but have been encoded as separate characters, due to their special use in mathematical notations. Italic, bold face, and even use of a sans-serif form vs. serif form may carry an essential difference of meaning in mathematics. For example, a bold italic “a” ...


3

The button in the upper-right corner of Character Viewer was the culprit. If I summon Character Viewer and click it, Character Viewer shrinks: From then on, further presses of control+command+space summon the pop-up panel instead. As to how I got to the full Character Viewer, opening Character Viewer from the menu bar Input menu (which can be turned on ...


3

I presume you don't have the English keyboard layout. You need to set up the U.S. Input Source, similar to what is described here (actually it's the other way around, you want to Check U.S.): How do I disable the Russian keyboard layout in software? Then select that Layout and press the key right to left Shift.


2

Character Palette ´ (prime): 2032 ˝ (double-prime): 2033 (thanks to Paul Berkowitz) Unicode Hex Input Keyboard ´ (prime): option 2 0 3 2 ˝ (double-prime): option 2 0 3 3 (thanks to @Ken's answer)


2

I keep a list of special characters here: http://dontpad.com/sy


2

Here is the easiest way to do this. You can copy and paste characters and text between the Mac and the remote Windows session. On the Mac, open a word processor and type Option-6 to get the "§" character. Copy this character. Click on the Microsoft Remote Desktop Client window, click in a word processor on the Windows computer you are connecting to, and ...



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