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Both iOS and OS X can use configuration profiles to install certificates. Apple has some nice documentation at https://help.apple.com/serverapp/mac/5.0/#/ for how to do that using Server.app. Luckily, you can use the same profile on iOS/OS X for certs although many other settings are unique to one or the other OS. I would recommend using Apple ...


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The com.apple.servermgrd certificate is only used to create a SSL connection from Server.App to the server backend admin daemon. It is safe to delete as it will be recreated. You should delete the cert with the following commands: sudo security set-identity-preference -n -s com.apple.servermgrd /Library/Keychains/System.keychain sudo security ...


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If you get signed and or encrypted email from folks who use SMIME, Mail.app will helpfully add their public x509 certificates to your login keychain. A pretty good explanation of the process can be found at Secure emails with Apple Mail


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Apple may occasionally approve additions to new Root CAs e.g. Verisign, who can then sign certificates for individual sites you visit. The root certificates for OS X El Capitan are here https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205204 I assume these are done in software updates via the App Store, but I don't know for sure. Also your company may add additional ...


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The root CAs are stored in: /System/Library/Keychains/SystemCACertificates.keychain /System/Library/Keychains/SystemRootCertificates.keychain Yes, these are OS X keychain files which are opaque, though not necessarily proprietary. You could theoretically use OS X's Keychain Services APIs to get at the certificate data inside the keychain file, but that ...


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Sign up with Apple as a paid developer and you can use your Mac App signing certificate to sign that app before distributing it. Your Apple ID will then allow Apple to trace things back to you should you sign something malicious and it comes to their attention. You're looking for the Mac Provisioning Certificate that Apple will sign and deliver you you from ...


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Since the subordinate CA's certificate is already "trusted" due to the root CA's cert being in the System Roots, you just need to use the add-certificates command, specifying the System keychain. sudo security add-certificates -k /Library/Keychains/System.keychain your_cert_file


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One thing to check, if jaume's procedure is still not working for you. Look at the access control list for the identity certificate that you want servermgrd to use. Make sure that the servermgrd binary is on the list. In later versions, the process listening on port 311 is called servermgr-listener so you may need to add that binary to the ACL as well.


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servermgrd looks up the certificate it uses for port 311 via an identity preference named "com.apple.servermgrd". By default, the preference points to the self-signed "com.apple.servermgrd" identity cert. After you change the preference you can remove the old self-signed cert without causing any harm. But you must make sure that the access control list (ACL) ...


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For me, I had to go to System Preferences -> Security & Firewall -> Privacy. On the left, click on Accessibility, then on the right side uncheck every checkbox. This resolves the problem. For me, I had Steam (from VALVe) running and Karabiner (keyboard key editor) which also was allowed to control the computer.



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