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10

Short answer, no. Longer answer, you can access Wifi data while on a call, but not cellular data: If you're in an area with Wifi coverage, you'll be able to talk on the phone while using data. If you're in an area with only LTE/3G/CDMA coverage, you will not be able to talk on the phone while using data. A statement from Verizon is over on The Verge: ...


10

According to this article, the problem isn't just the size. It turns out, as well as a smaller size, the Nano SIM is reportedly 15% thinner than the Micro SIM cards. So even if users cut the Micro SIM to Nano SIm size with a knife or nano SIM cutter tool, the Sim card would still be too thick to put in the iPhone 5.


9

Nomenclature The terms 2G, 3G and 4G do not refer to a specific wireless standard, but a a whole bunch of different standards: There has been controversy on what standards should be referred to as 4G. When Apple introduced the iPhone 4S, they followed other companies in referring to HSDPA as a 4G standard. HSPA+ is the successor to HSDPA. DC-HSPA+ ...


8

Short answer, yes (assuming you have LTE coverage in your area by T-Mobile). But you should get the iPhone 5s from Verizon instead of getting it from T-Mobile. Also, carrier unlocking has nothing to do with 3G or LTE. Long answer follows below. The iPhone 5s models A1533 (GSM) and A1533 (CDMA) support the LTE bands that both Verizon and T-Mobile use. If ...


7

You can't convert a GSM iPhone to run on the CDMA network, unfortunately. Neither the functional nor the cosmetic components are interchangeable. If your friend is willing to give you his iPhone and if it's still in decent condition you could probably sell it for enough to fund the purchase of a Verizon iPhone. If it's not in great condition and you still ...


7

There are two separate issues here: 1. Transferring data plans This is best dealt with directly through your carrier as CajunLuke notes. For person A, a simple SIM swap should work though, for person B you'll need to cut the 3G's SIM down to micro-SIM size to fit in the iPhone 4. And you can probably swap the SIM from the dumbphone into the 3G and have the ...


6

As you've pointed out, US iPhones are locked to AT&T. Fundamentally, that's your only real issue here. If you can unlock your iPhone, then your suggesting of just picking up a micro-sim and using it for data and calls works perfectly. In the UK, we can buy iPhones unlocked, and get our network operators to unlock them. What you described is exactly what ...


6

No. CDMA will only work of you buy and activate your 4S device onto a CDMA carrier. The FAQ shows that when you activate the phone it will choose one technology for coverage in country. GSM Registered phones will roam on GSM as will CDMA phones. Sprint should work in 35 unnamed countries and Verizon in 40 at launch.


6

It means that you are connected on HSPA+. It's actually a 3G technology, and unfortunately, you probably won't experience any speed increase in downloading or surfing. The 4G technology for the "new iPad" is LTE, and is much faster than the existing 3G band. 4G iPhone On AT&T? New Network Indicator Causes Controversy


6

You can enable "Airplane Mode" and then turn on Wi-Fi. For phones that use a GSM sim card (even if they are on CDMA networks), if you remove the SIM card, you disable the cellular radio. Calls and cellular data stop flowing in this case. The most precise manner is in the settings app: Settings > General > Cellular > Cellular Data -> OFF


5

It appears that very little, and it can be completely disabled. Carrier IQ, the now infamous “rootkit” or “keylogger”, is not just for Android, Symbian, BlackBerry, and even webOS. In fact, up through and including iOS 5, Apple has included a copy of Carrier IQ on the iPhone. However, it does appears to be disabled along with diagnostics enabled ...


5

No, you do not have to enter any sort of unlock code for any iPhone unlock event. iTunes contacts the registration database when a phone is restored to determine the lock status and set the appropriate carrier settings file if needed. So, in your case one of two things has happened. The database that Apple / iTunes consult hasn't been updated for your ...


4

ArsTechnica notes that there is no noticeable signal loss when gripping it with the 'death grip'. Though due to the way smart phone antennas are designed, it still may be possible


4

I asked this question so I could answer it, as I said there are a lot of people asking me about this issue. On this page of Apple's support website, you can find a list of worldwide carriers and the features they support on the iPhone.


4

For my part, I was able to change the carrier name for the iPhone 5.1 simulator by editing this file: /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneSimulator.platform/Developer/SDKs/iPhoneSimulator5.1.sdk/System/Library/CoreServices/SpringBoard.app/French.lproj/SpringBoard.strings As the path suggests, I'm French. Switch to whichever ...


4

There is one crucial step missing, after you backup your phone you must restore it. This puts it in factory fresh condition briefly and completes the unlock. After you do this and if AT&T approved unlocking your iPhone, then you will see the message indicating that your iPhone has been unlocked. You can then restore from your backup to bring back all ...


4

short answer: No The iPhone 5 has the Nano-SIM The iPhone 4 and 4s have the Micro-SIM iPhone 5 is not compatible with existing micro-SIM cards. found on the apple site You have to go to your mobile provider and get a replacement Nano-SIM if you're using the micro-SIM. The other way around you can use an adapter or get a replacement SIM as well. It ...


4

The tech specs page lists the available network features per model in more detail. GSM model A1428: UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz); LTE (Bands 4 and 17) CDMA model A1429: CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and Rev. B (800, 1900, 2100 MHz); UMTS/HSPA+/DC-HSDPA (850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz); GSM/EDGE (850, 900, 1800, ...


4

The iPad Mini model A1454 is designed and will only work on LTE bands 4 (AWS) and 17 (700b MHz). http://www.apple.com/ipad/LTE/ Since 4G means so much, you may have to ask your specific carrier if they use either of these LTE bands. Even if your carrier operates in those bands, there still isn't a guarantee they support iPad so you'd really need to ...


4

Blacklisted IMEI or MEID on iPhones are usually one of two things: Clerical mistakes - contact the police or a cell carrier for assistance in clearing up that mistake. Stolen goods (or goods reported as stolen) - again the police or a lawyer might be your next step if you find out you have purchased stolen goods. You might want to contact the seller ...


3

The iPhone 4S is a world-phone, compatible with Verizon and Sprint's CDMA networks in the US and GSM networks worldwide. It has a micro-SIM slot for connecting to GSM networks. Most phones sold in the US are locked to the carrier you buy it from, you may have luck getting them to unlock it so you can use a different SIM. Unlocked iPhones are (tautologically) ...


3

I have a Verizon iPhone 4, and while I'm not using it with an actual Exchange server, I have several Gmail and Google Apps accounts setup as Exchange accounts that push emails to me without issue. I would try two things if I were you: Setup a Google account on your iPhone as an Exchange account if you have't already, and see if those emails get pushed to ...


3

As an add-on to the Ars report: photos of the adjustment of button locations also show differing locations of the breaks in the metal band around the device, so it's quite possible there was a real hardware change. Other pictures show different breaks near the bottom of the phone, too.


3

Due to the differences between CDMA and GSM, the antenna notches have been moved around. There are also 4 now instead of 3, and as a result of adding a notch on the left side of the phone, the mute switch is slightly lower on the Verizon iPhone 4 than the AT&T iPhone 4, which could cause cases made for the AT&T iPhone 4 to not fit the Verizon iPhone ...


3

No. The LTE standard uses different frequencies in the US and Europe. However, the model sold in Europe is the US model. This has been officially confirmed by Apple [1, german]. LTE in the iPad The iPad supports only the frequencies 700 and 2100 MHz [2] for LTE use. These frequencies are not used for LTE in the EU. If you take a look at the footnotes, ...


3

Turns out I wasn't the only person that's been interested in this. There's an article on MacRumors that states that this is indeed possible, which is good news for me. The person that discovered it wrote: Big question on everyone's mind buying the Verizon iPad was whether data from AT&Ts 3G network would work on this iPad, or if Verizon/Apple would ...


3

If you bought the device without a contract, it's unlocked! The information about AT&T and Verizon is important when talking about LTE availability in the US. Only AT&T and Verizon provide LTE networks in the US that work with the iPad. 4G LTE is supported only on AT&T and Verizon networks in the U.S. and on Bell, Rogers, and Telus networks ...


3

Yes, the two models are physically different. The radio is different. As per Apple's website, the radio frequencies aren't the same. The verizon iPad supports Verizon LTE, and as per this post, AT&T 3G. However, the Verizon iPad does not support all LTE frequencies that the AT&T iPad does. From Apple.com: Wi-Fi + 4G for AT&T model: 4G LTE ...


3

The "o" means that you're on a 2G network. In Verizon's case, that would be 1xRTT. If you see it on an AT&T device, that means you're on GPRS. Here's a screenshot from the iPad User Guide detailing what the various signal indicators mean: "3G" means exactly the same thing on the 1st generation iPad as it does on the 3rd generation iPad. However, if ...


3

On CDMA networks, the ° symbol means that you're connected to a 1xRTT network. You might not be able to receive calls while transferring data over the network. On GSM networks, it means that you're connected to a GPRS network. This Apple support article goes into further detail on possible connectivity indicators for different cellular networks. For your ...



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