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To rename the Recovery Partition, falsely named "EFI Boot", I first mounted the Recovery HD, by showing all partitions in Disk Utility. To show all partitions: 1.) quit Disk Utility 2.) In Terminal write or paste: defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUShowEveryPartition 1 and hit 'enter'. Launch Disk Utility and mount the hidden, but now showing "Recovery ...


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According to Apple, you must use BootCamp to initialize a Windows partition or it won't work. I suggest you do the following. Get WinClone if you don't already have it. The best way to back up your BootCamp partition. http://twocanoes.com/winclone/ Use WinClone to back up your BootCamp partition. Initialize your new hard disk to Mac OS X. Use BootCamp ...


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Tuxera is an app that makes NTFS filesystems fully readable & writable. There is a 15-Day trial for it. So you can download Windows Support, and just put it into for example your C:\Users\User\Desktop instead of putting it on a USB. If you cannot find the BOOTCAMP partition on your Desktop. Press Command+Alt+G and type /Volumes/ and there search for ...


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you can try to connect you HDD to another mac. you can create full copy of this disk via dd vith noerror parameter If you use windows you cat use Ext2Read for access to linux partition.


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How to install Windows without using the BootCamp Assistant. Download and copy the Boot Camp Support Software to a flash drive. You will need this later. You need to create a "MS-DOS (FAT)" formatted partition. One way would be during a clean install. Use the Disk Utility to create a two partitions. The first would be "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)" for ...


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Your layout sounds reasonable. I can't answer this fully for you, but what I'd suggest is setting up both a Boot Camp and VM (or the Boot Camp as a VM disk), trying both ways out for a while, and see what works best for you. Some of this is personal taste and you may just have to find out for yourself. I have a similar setup: Retina MacBook Pro; Mac for ...


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Your data in Mac drive may be encrypted by FileVault, so other OS suppose not to see this encrypted drive. Go to System Preferences -> Security and Privacy -> FileVault -> Turn off. It works based on my experience.


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The answer is it was never worked that way. If you want it to work that way, you have to install a boot manager. The most common free one is call rEFInd. Most people install this software in the OS X partition, but this can lead to problems when you install updates. I installed rEFInd in its own partition to avoid such problems. I would go with @ryebread's ...


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The answer is No. Sorry. I have done this already. Here is the problem. VirtualBox and your Apple use different hardware. If you try to switch between the hardware you are going to drive windows insane. If you first install Windows using VirtualBox's virtual hardware and a physical disk partition, then switch to Apple's physical hardware with the same ...


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While VirtualBox is capable of Raw Disk Access it is not designed to use the Windows Boot Camp partition as a virtual machine. In other words it does not handle the Windows Product Activation between running it physically and virtually. VMware Fusion, a paid product, is capable of seamlessly handing using the Windows Boot Camp partition as a virtual ...


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Winclone is the OS X software to backup and restore the Windows OS on a BootCamp partition. http://twocanoes.com/winclone/ It lets you escape Apple's restriction to only have two OS partitions on a drive. You still might have to delete bootcamp, but you can then restore it in working form after you've re-done the boot drive partitioning to your liking. ...


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You'll need a third party utility that can repartition a live drive. The Apple software will not make additional partitions beyond the Bootcamp one. Or, the hard-but-effective way is to back everything up, wipe and repartition, then copy back. Winclone is a good program for backing up Boot Camp partitions. Personally, this issue was worth it to me to buy ...


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The reason is that with the latest version of OS X, the internal drive is converted to a Core Storage volume, rather than the simple HFS+ volume you presumably had on your old computer. Apple still hasn't rolled out support for this in many areas, Windows included. You won't be able to access your files directly anymore from within Windows until Apple gets ...


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Download BootChamp. You get a shortcut that reboots into Windows, but it doesn't change the default OS. Seems to work really well.


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OS X Yosemite automatically converts hard drives to Core Storage volumes, whose sizes can't be changed. You need to undo the Core Storage conversion. Here are instructions for making that happen. (source - this method worked for me). This method should be non-destructive, but as always, take a backup first! Boot into Recovery HD. If for any reason you ...



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