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Yes, you can. windowssupport.dmg is a large but disposable file. System requires it once when you installing Windows. After that you've got no reason to keep it at your drive.


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Usually the person asking the question does not give enough information for a answer to be generated. So, I will try anyway. Does, the PC have a working bootable DVD drive? If so, just use the OS X Disk Utility application to burn the iso to a DVD. If your PC can boot from a flash drive, then you have two options. First, use some machine running windows to ...


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This is correct. You need to have a bootable media with Windows on it to install Windows on bootcamp. When the process reboots to install Windows, the .iso will be unmounted and useless. You can write the ISO to a flash drive (8GB or more) using disk utility and use that.


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UPDATE: There are three partitioning schemes used by both Windows and OS X. The first is MBR, which has been around since the 1980’s. The second is GPT, which is fairly new. The third is a hybrid scheme which combines the first two. OS X’s Disk Utility application allows you to select either MBR or GPT. If MBR is selected, then you get the traditional MBR ...


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The first thing to do is to eject your CD/DVD and then power down the Mac and then disconnect any drives and accessories other than your keyboard and monitor. Then boot the Mac and as soon as you hear the fans start or the chime - hold only the option key down. This should boot to a grey screen that lists any bootable OS that are connected. At this point, ...


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Apologies if you've already assured yourself of this. In my experience, holding down the various keyboard shortcut keys (particularly the Command-R "Internet Recovery" key sequence) works even without bootable volumes attached. You report no difference holding any keys down during boot, which is odd. Are you sure your Mac is receiving these keystrokes? ...


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Yes, Windows 10 works fine in Boot Camp, but the Boot Camp Support Software doesn't really launch correctly. In compatibility mode, it seems to work but I haven't extensively tested whether the settings actually make a difference. Technical Previews are generally 'buggy' too so problems may not solely be due to Boot Camp.


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Right, now we have more information to go on, go to Applications > Utilities > Disk Utility. On the left pane you will see a list of storage devices, your boot drive should be at the top of the list. You should see the top device broken down into partitions. Highlight the "parent" drive (top of the list) and then click on Partition. In the main area you will ...


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You won't be able to install or remove Windows7/8 with Boot Camp Assistant because you have a non-standard partition layout and the file system of your Windows partition is wrong (HFS+!): /dev/disk0 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *751.3 GB disk0 1: ...


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From http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204154 How many Apple Thunderbolt Displays can I use with a Mac in Windows 7 or 8 with Boot Camp? Most Mac computers can support one Thunderbolt display using Windows. The iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) and Mac mini (Late 2014) can support two, and the Mac Pro (Late 2013) can support up to six.


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Boot to the Recovery HD after completing a full back up of the Mac side of things just to be safe. Open Disk Utility Select the Bootcamp partition and delete it. Then drag the bottom right corner of the Mac partition to expand it back to full size. Read the warnings carefully - Disk Utility will tell you which partitions will be deleted and which will ...


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These are the instructions for a Windows 7 Professional Service Pack 1 (64 bit) installation. Here, I assume the Boot Camp Support Software 4.0.4033 has been copied to a flash drive. The instructions were adapted from the originals given here. Determine the drive letter of your flash drive, by inserting the drive in a USB port on the Mac. Below is an ...


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Update 3: Sorry it took so long to get back. I have been doing some reading. There two ways for a operating system to boot on a Mac. The first involves using the legacy BIOS which assumes the disk is partitioned using a MBR scheme. The second uses the EFI which (in our case) assumes the disk is partitioned using a GPT scheme. Macs provide both partition ...


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Firstly, I would think about how much you want to share between the two. What documents are you going to be messing with on both sides. If it's a significant amount you might want to consider a third partition for documents, and then setup a partition each for the OSs to boot from. Given the time spent in each you probably want full performance from each ...



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