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The question does not mention a model, let's assume that the Mac is a model that gained a firmware update in connection with Yosemite. If so, then – for use with Mavericks (without Yosemite) – it may be desirable to reinstall lesser firmware. … Erased HD … – that would have erased an operating system without affecting firmware. A suggestion ...


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Here is the set of Start up keys that you can try. I would try the Safe mode first, followed by Apple Hardware Test. If it does not boot in Safe mode and passes the Apple Hardware Test, use the OS X recovery "cmd+r" to restore your OS X installation.


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Have you tried just command-v at startup? If it doesn't start up after that, check for any disk I/O Errors in the startup process. You will need to make sure you press that key combination straight after the boot chime. If the machine doesn't boot at all, you may try to reset the SMC. The procedure for this depends on the Mac model you have, see this Apple ...


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Did you try to press the "option" key during startup? This will prompt you to select the startup disk if several are available. Set the system to boot into the one you will boot into most often, and if you want to boot into the other, press "option" when you switch the Mac on and wait for the prompt.


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Presumably Windows messed up with your OS X boot code. You have to rebuild this code. Since OS X tools can not handle a false flagged partition you have to set the correct partition flag and afterwards rebuild the boot code using OS X Disk Utility. Since you can't boot from the now unaccessible recovery partition you have to have Linux-tools and a second ...


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For the sake of completeness, rather than add endless updates to the question, I have now achieved an reinstall from scratch. Once I discovered there was a second install on the other hard drive, I reconfigured the arrangement of the drives so that the Mac booted from the other. This took a few trial-and-error permutations with the disk cabling, and the ...


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Unfortunately you may have hardware issues if yours is an "Early 2011" model, many owners have reported symptoms similar to yours with the culprit being failed ball grid array solder on the graphics processor. There's some info here. The article has a link for a utility that will allow you run solely on the integrated Intel HD3000 graphics so at least you'll ...


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It is probably your video card. The 2007 MBP's were prone to this. Here is how you can tell. Download the Ultimate Boot CD. Burn it to a DVD or a USB Stick You will launch Linux with a ton of useful diagnostic tools. Run everything, but especially the video display diagnostic tool. Mine was throwing errors and I was able to definitively find the cause ...


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The Yosemite Installer package contains all the divers for all supported models. You are good to go for multiple uses on multiple systems.


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The server is ping-able the entire time, but startup utilities such as SSH and other are never started; or at least they aren’t reachable. That happens because while a system might be pingable, that only happens at the most “embryonic” levels of any system booting into existence. This is why simply pinging a server is not the best way to determine ...


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Give this a try. If you can get to single user mode you can remove the file that OS X checks for during boot to determine if the Mac has already been setup. If it doesn't find the file then it boots to the setup assistant, which allows you to create a new admin user. Try resetting PRAM: Shutdown the Mac While holding ⌘+option+P+R, power on the Mac ...


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It's probably due your firmware password. It prevents Mac from booting using options keys.


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Yosemite is taking all RAM during the dead start, allow it to boot for more than 40 minutes. The screen will eventually go black, allow it to continue... finally, it will finish the start up and present the normal login screen. After 10 minutes of sluggish operation, it will be normal. Eventually Apple may fix the problem.


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hold the C key to boot from any media(s)


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Here is how to burn a bootable USB stick (taken from the Ubuntu website): Open the Terminal (in /Applications/Utilities/ or query Terminal in Spotlight). Convert the .iso file to .img using the convert option of hdiutil e.g., hdiutil convert -format UDRW -o ~/path/to/target.img ~/path/to/windows.iso Note: OS X tends to put the .dmg ending on the output ...


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According to the Ubuntu site, you can do the following: Launch Disk Utility (Applications → Utilities → Disk Utility). Insert your blank CD/DVD. Drag and drop your .iso file to the left pane in Disk Utility. Now both the blank disc and the .iso should be listed. Select the .iso file, and click on the Burn button in the toolbar. Ensure that the "Verify ...


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The USB stick cannot boot on Mac without Bootcamp. The Windows expects a BIOS, but Mac has EFI. That's why you cannot boot from that USB stick.


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I am not sure if I found a real solution or not, but I've got my computer working properly again at least for the last few days. I believe the problem is mechanical; the contact between the hard drive and the logic board is not great. I hypothesize that it's something to do with batteries expanding somehwat inside the case, causing problems, but it could ...


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My son took the computer to the Apple store which found, through their testing, that the hard drive had gone bad and he replaced the drive. Everything is working now though he lost all his data.


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To me USB stays USB. Type-C is just a physical form factor as Type-A and Type-B. So yes it will work.


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Considering the just announced new MacBook isn't yet generally available there are very few people, if any, that can say they've actually connected a LaCie USB-C (USB 3.0) external drive to the just announced new MacBook and booted either OS X or Windows from the external drive. That said, I'd be very shocked if one was not able to boot any OS that supports ...


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It should work, but if you use SuperDuper! a workaround is necessary: I backed up my main system volume (hereinafter referred to as "System") to the unencrypted! backup volume (hereinafter referred to as "SystemBackup"). After rebooting to SystemBackup i tried to encrypt the volume SystemBackup, which wasn't successful, because the Recovery HD on the backup ...


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When you encrypt a disk with filevault 2, your mac will start up from the recovery disk to load your OS. At the login screen you enter your password to decrypt the disk. It means that it will take some more time to log you in. I think it will work as log as you have a recovery partition. But if you do not really need filevault on the external drive, i ...


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In my opinion this should work. To play safe: If you are able to create a bootable USB stick with a full blown OS installation, try it. :) The only thing I am currently thinking about is, when you started from your harddisk and encrypt an external drive, the keys for the drive (if it is bootable) need to be on the drive you are encrypting. Otherwise on boot ...


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If you don't want to use Disk Warrior or something similar to get your volumes back, there is a small chance to recover your partitions manually: You'll need some tools and luck to accomplish that: Install a full vanilla system (Mountain Lion or Mavericks should work) on a thumb drive. A recovery system will not work. Boot to the thumb drive, download and ...


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You might want to try using internet recovery again, completely erasing the disk using the supplied disk utility. (select the drive (not the partition) and use the delete tab. This will also recreate the partition map accordingly. Also, try using safe boot (hold shift while booing). If that doesn't do the trick boot in verbose mode, which will give you more ...


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I agree with your assessment of the situation. There is rampant inconsistency in dual-boot installation instructions, all of which contain glaring errors. Careful notes are not being recorded or the procedures are just being made up out of thin air or recollections from work done months ago. The confusion is not being caused by anything Apple is doing but ...


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Just tried out the solution to reconnect to my TV and go to system Preferences -> Displays and select Built-in Retina Display of the drop-down menu Optimize for : Then take the HDMI cable out. It works!!


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To solve the problems we have to place the HDD on the original place. Then we place the SSD to the SuperDrive place. Just install Yosemite as usual and everything is working now.


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I'm not sure about the former question without getting hands-on but here's a fix... My usual advice - boot your Mac and download the 10.10 installer from Apple. Do not run the installer, cancel it. Next, build a USB installer from the 10.10 installer so you can perform a completely clean install. Take an 8GB USB stick and (very important) name it Untitled. ...


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Have you tried Command+R when booting to access your recovery partition (if Yosemite created one during installation)? That would be your easy get-out-of-jail-free card. Otherwise you're looking at seeking the help of some kindly Mac owner who has disc images of the original install discs (or a retail Snow Leopard disc). If you put some contact details in ...


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Assuming it is now charged… Hold Home & Power buttons for at least 45 seconds, see if it starts up normally. If not… Plug your iPad's USB cable into a computer with iTunes. Hold down the Home button [keep holding] and connect to your iPad. Keep holding the Home button until you see a screen telling you to connect to iTunes. iTunes should show you ...



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