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3

Looking at the tech specs for Apple's latest iMacs, all the 21.5" models seem to have 5400-rpm hard drives unless you specifically upgraded yours. (I can't find a 3.5 GHz model actually so I couldn't verify your model and I also couldn't comment to ask.) Based on the assumption that you do in fact have a model with a 5400-rpm dive, your boot time doesn't ...


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The Booting from USB issue Ok, so first off. I don't know how you made the bootable USB, but for the sake of consistency in my answer I will give you a method to use: Download Mavericks for the App store. (I checked, it is still there for downloading) Plug in the USB drive you want to boot from (has to be 8GB or more) Then from the Terminal app run this ...


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If you go into the screen that lets you re-download the OS and also gives you the ability to see disk utility command + r during bootup. Run disk utility and select the Mac Harddriive [not the OS partition] and run the Repair Disk Permissions feature and then restart the computer and you should have a permanent solution to the black/gray screen. RECAP ...


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Ok, I managed to boot to Safe mode using this: Access the command line by either opening Terminal remotely, or by logging into the computer using SSH. Use the following Terminal command: sudo nvram boot-args="-x" If you want to start in Verbose mode as well, use sudo nvram boot-args="-x -v" instead. After using Safe Mode, use this ...


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A clean install is not necessary, you simply need to reconfigure your NVRAM (nvram boot-args=kext-dev-mode=1) to disable the kext signing requirement for OS X. (After which, you can remove your TRIM enabler and reverse this change or leave it until the next time your NVRAM is changed/resets) A very clear explanation of OS X 10.10 Yosemite's new policy ...


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You need to make sure that you are using the correct build for your iMac. In this document: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1159 you can find the exact build for your iMac, then you have to make sure that you are using a 10.9 version after the minimum build your computer requires. In case you have trouble with that, I find that the best way is to "buy" ...


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Depending on your Macs you might use the FireWire/Thunderbolt target-disk mode. Apple-KB: If you have two Mac computers with FireWire or Thunderbolt ports, you can connect them so that one of them appears as an external hard disk on the other. This is called “target disk mode.” 1. Connect the two computers with a FireWire or Thunderbolt cable. ...


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Sounds about right to me. Mine would take that kind of time until I put an SSD in it. You could try starting in Safe Mode [hold shift after the chimes] & see if there is any significant difference.


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If your EFI is not working, you will need to restore it. Download from here for your model. Then follow the procedure described here.


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This is normal behaviour for Yosemite for users with FileVault enabled (i.e. Your Mac's primary disk is encrypted). The authentication process is done earlier because without authorisation from the user the OS cannot access the rest of the disk. This is a good thing, and I think you are (mostly) mistaken that it takes longer to boot up — since now you are ...


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Change sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/Untitled 2 --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app --nointeraction to sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Yosemite.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume "/Volumes/Untitled 2" --applicationpath ...


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Use this path instead: /Volumes/Untitled\ 2/ The backslash tells the terminal that the space is included in the path, otherwise it thinks your volume is called /Volumes/Untitled and that there is a random 2 argument in the command.



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