New answers tagged

0

Yes, you can do this with disk utility. When you try to access the FileVault encrypted disk it will prompt for a password. You can then select it as the source for a restore to another drive.


1

Yes, you could just copy it back, but it may not be bootable. That can be fixed by installing OS X over the top of your files. It should preserve what is there and make it bootable.


2

It appears you are looking at the iCloud info in System Preferences on an Apple laptop or desktop. Inside System Preferences, after you click on iCloud, you then click on Manage in the lower right corner. When that window comes up, the top option is highlighted but not necessarily selected. If it's not selected, the backups will not show in the right column. ...


0

You can turn it off, but then you wouldn't be able to backup. If you have a Mac or PC, iTunes installed, your lightning or 30-pin dock connecter cable, a resonable amount of free space, you can backup with iTunes. It won't nag you. Plug in your iPhone, open iTunes, click your iPhone, and scroll to where it says backups, click iTunes, you can backup Health ...


0

Solved by formatting the Time Capsule drive and reconfiguring Time Machine on the Mac.


0

Just Checking that you have not missed the "holding option key down in time machine" thing that I missed for ages: Source: http://www.macworld.co.uk/feature/mac-software/complete-guide-time-machine-mac-backup-3626572/ Complete guide to Time Machine: Can I browse Time Machine backups from another Mac, or older Time Machine backups from my own Mac that I no ...


0

There is no straight-forward answer to your question without a full list of applications you're looking to migrate. Some applications that don't use installers, can easily be simply copied to an external drive and back again, and will continue to work just fine. Some applications that don't have installers, may ask for the license keys when you restore ...


2

There are two ways of having backups encrypted. First, Time Capsule allows for you to encrypt the disk. If you enable this, the disk can only be mounted by the device if you provide it with the password to do so. This encryption is local and thus doesn't address your concern. It does mean that if the disk somehow gets taken out of the TC, it can't be read. ...


0

Turn on automatic backups. Whenever plugged in, locked, and connected to wifi, the device will backup. Call Apple if you are not sure how to turn on backups.


0

Time Machine only uses a disk image when backing up to a network destination (OS X Server or Time Capsule). When backing up to a local volume (as you appear to be doing), it stores the backed-up files natively on the volume (inside the Backups.backupdb folder), with no disk image.


1

This file is where Backblaze stores information about what is stored on their servers and copies of files being uploaded or about to be uploaded. I would exclude this from Time Machine backups, as it will often change and contains nothing you're not already backing up elsewhere.


1

I can't help with the Google Drive question. I can help with a better backup script. I do backups from local disk to local disk using a tool called rsync that comes installed on every Mac and can be accessed in Terminal or using a script like the one you have. rsync --verbose --ignore-errors --archive --exclude '.*' --itemize-changes --delete --progress ...


0

I use two strategies to archive backups when using Time Machine: Use more than one drive in Time Machine Preferences. Each time a backup starts, the software picks one drive round-robin style, so with three backups, each connected drive gets one interval every three hours. Selectively pick one interval from a backup destination and archive that snapshot ...


1

I suggest you break it up into two parts: copy the files, then compress them. Apple has the simplest solution to copy files and you can use the Finder to do so; then try the disk compression routine, if you want to go that route. Faced with this situation a few years ago at home, and having similar problems, I realized I was just jumping through hoops. I ...


0

First of all, I see that I can restore those: Notes, Reminder, Apple Mail, Apple Contacts, Apple Calendar, Photos. Then, you can also restore MANUALLY for those contents: Contacts, Calendars, Bookmarks. PS: I'm using IP 5S. ^^


0

A backup drive is automatically excluded from a Time Machine backup. In your case the nested backup strategy will not work using Time Machine because External HDD1 will be excluded from being backed up to External HDD2: Macintosh HD -> External HDD1 (TM1 + Data) Macintosh HD -> External HDD2 (External HDD1 will be excluded) You may either split ...


0

If you click the "Google Photos Backup" icon in your menu bar (looks like a gray pinwheel), you should see the "Preferences" option. Clicking this will open the preferences window. There you should see a checkbox for "Also copy photos/videos from external media to" (See image below). Uncheck this box and you shouldn't have the extra backups anymore.


-1

To create a DMG using hdiutil (command line): hdiutil create /path/to/folder.dmg -srcfolder /path/to/folder This will archive everything in a directory to /path/to/folder.dmg.(There's a pretty good guide on using hdiutil found here, along with man hdiutil.) To create a DMG using Disk Utility (GUI): Depending on your preference, either press ⌘ Command+⇧ ...


2

I would recommend using hdiutil to image the disk. First, run diskutil list in the Terminal to see the identifiers for each disk. You'll want to note the identifier for your Time Machine drive (format is /dev/disk#). Then, in the Terminal, use: /usr/bin/hdiutil create -srcdevice /your/disk/identifier -format UDZO name.dmg Where /your/disk/identifier is ...


-1

Time Machine backup includes all the history of whatever you backup. So even if you have say 20GB worth of data backed up, provided there are enough changes to the data the overall Time Machine backup can easily fill much more space than those 20GB. This is because it keeps all the different versions of backed up files, in case you ever need to restore a ...


-1

Look in Utilities/Keychain to see if the backup password is there


0

Get Backup Pro (http://www.belightsoft.com/getbackup/) is an awesome tool. Great value for money, and really great features like bootable and encrypted backups, disk cloning, folder sync, backing up mounted disks, choosing which files to backup and compress folders – Time Machine simply can’t do some of these things! Also, incremental/versioned archives and ...


0

You can do this quite easily by "taking ownership" of the files. By issuing the command: sudo chown -R <username> **file/folder** sudo executes the command as a root (aka "Super User"). It will ask you to enter a password when you press Return chown is the command that "changes ownership" -R tells it to do it recursively through all sub-folders ...


0

You could use "BatChMod"to change the permissions on the folder and its contents to your own user's credentials (that is, to the credentials of the user you are logged in with on the machine you've connected the backup disk to). This is much easier than using the command line. http://www.lagentesoft.com/batchmod/ I am not associated with the people who ...


1

If you are an administrator (i.e. have an admin account) on the MacBook Air and are familiar with the command line interface you can use the sudo command to obtain machine-level admin rights. Once you have those rights, you can access the files in that folder. An example of this might be: $ cd ~/Desktop $ mkdir luannsphotos $ sudo cp -R ...


4

Yes. You can always restore from and older to a newer iOS version, however you can't go from a newer iOS version and restore to an older version.


0

Sparsebundles are created for each machine backed up to Time Machine. I needed to delete one of these sparsebundle files. Manually deleting thousands of files under the 'Bands' folder takes a long time. The faster and easiest method is: Open Terminal Switch to 'Superuser': sudo su (you will be asked for your admin user pw) Change directory to your Time ...


0

Nope, unfortunately for you, one cannot backup his iOS device without knowing the passcode. The reason likely comes from Apple not wanting backups, albeit passcode-protected ones, made by others who are not authorized by the user to do so. Also, though it would take very long, if the reward was great enough (like cracking a celebrity's or an executive of a ...


0

Unfortunately there is no way to access a password protected backup without having the correct password (passwords are there for a reason). You can check if you have an iCloud backup available from your iPhone 5, but as far as the iTunes backup you won't be able to access it until you enter the correct password. Apple specifically mentions that "There is no ...


3

This can even be done in Time Machine: Choose the 5 TB HDD as only Time Machine backup drive (OK, my disks are smaller πŸ˜‰ ): Then exclude your internal drive by adding it to the excluded items - the backup drive is excluded automatically: The final result: You get a folder Backups.backupdb with one folder vm (the name of my Mac) containing folders ...



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