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I had this problem too, the best thing you can do is replace the harddrive since it will eventually break beyond repair. Macs are quite sensitive to faulty hdd's so there is a good chance you can still use the drive as external drive and get your data from it. so: Replace the drive yourself if you can (ifixit) or have it replaced Get a hard drive enclosure ...


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I would try to mount your hard drive via "target disk mode". This will require another computer but works much better if possible. Support page for transferring files via target mode. http://support.apple.com/kb/PH10725


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I've seen this happen a few times in the district i work for. We have almost 13,000 macs total. What I usually do is boot the machine with the bad hdd into target disk mode by holding the T key at startup. Once its in target disk mode you can plug it into another mac via thunderbolt and it should show up in Finder. If it doesn't show up in finder then open ...


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You can specify folders to be excluded from your Time Machine backup, specifically, you could specify everything BUT your specific files. You can access this by going to system preferences > time machine > options. For example, I have an SD card that's always in my MacBook Air missing from my time machine backup, because I prefer to keep that separated. So ...


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Go to ~/Library/Keychains on your new Mac and make a copy/backup of your actual login.keychain with cmd D Copy the old login.keychain in /Users/old_user_name/Library/Keychains from the backup to your desktop and rename it to loginold.keychain Open Keychain Access.app and choose File -> 'Add Keychain...' in the menu, navigate to your desktop and select ...


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Simply log in into iCloud Control Panel on your Mac or PC (using your Apple ID and password) and press [Storage]; you will see the list of available devices/backups on the account:


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Looks like you need to encrypt your iPhone backups for your local backups to retain health data: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT6357 Hope this helps?


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IF the onedrive is mounted then you can use sync and cron with a script (Please note on kindle fire and format may be off so this will be simple): cd $HOME rsync -ar . /Volumes/<mount point of one drive> This has more details: Once you have saved script, and gave it execute permission, use crontab -e to add your frequency. Please see this for ...


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Open finder and navigate to the folder on the Time Machine volume and drag it on to your desktop. Time Machine places each backup in it's own folder so you can easily get to the one folder you want to restore and do it by hand. You can use the Time Machine interface to restore that folder as well, but Finder is more direct. You are correct so skip migration ...


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I think the 'modern equivalent' of your anticipated disaster recovery scenario could still be done by CCC, with caveats. Receive new machine, ready with Recovery partition & brand new OS, clone CCC boot partition back to new boot partition. Assuming parity with machine/drivers etc, i.e. like for like, then I foresee no issues. The same maybe couldn't ...


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I believe that ALL current Mac's with should run in Target Disk Mode for FireWire or ThunderBolt. You may want to verify this for your specific models since there have been a few systems that lacked TDM. Both systems should be able to run the version of Mac OS that you are cloning. And old version of OS will not always be able to run on new hardware. Very ...


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The system is clearly designed to take great pains to not lose your data, however whenever you rewrite the core part of the OS that is responsible for booting the system, that is the time when you are most likely to discover a problem: Your hard drive or hardware could be flakey and the volume of changes exposes a pre-existing problem that was un-noticed ...


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It turns out my particular problem wasn't covered by other, similar cases, so I'm going to post my own answer describing the actual issue I had, and the solution I found to it. In my case it appears that somehow my last "complete" Time Machine backup was in fact corrupted somehow; when I looked inside it I found that the contents of my user folder were ...


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Backing up to iCloud is only a backup, it will not free up space on your iOS device.. you'll need to free up space manually. You can find more information on iCloud storage and backup overview here: http://support.apple.com/kb/PH12519?viewlocale=en_US&locale=en_US


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Yes, it's essentially a case of just copying over, but with some caveats. Must be GUID/MacOS Extended, Journalled; with Ownership on. Then... Switch off Time Machine Copy Data Select new drive & switch back on. Full guide at Time Machine: How to transfer backups from the current backup drive to a new backup drive


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When you find the file in Time Machine, you can right-click it and select "Restore xyz to ..." . That lets you choose a destination folder.


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In Contacts Version 8.0 (1371) running on OS X 10.9.4, you can export a multi-card file in the .vcf format as follows: Launch the Contacts application. Ensure that all your contacts are showing by clicking "All Contacts" in the Groups panel. (If you don't see the Groups panel, which starts with "All Contacts," on the left side of the window, choose View > ...


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They are still two separate devices. Restoring from a backup does not change that. So the next time each one runs a backup, it will be done separately, even if the devices have the same name. (That said, I would suggest for ease of identification, you change the name on one.)



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