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8

It depends. If you have an Apple Developer account ($99 per year), you can create either a ad hoc distribution profile or use a development certificate. For more information on that, view here. Although it is called beta testing, it serves your purpose. Now if you don't have an Apple Developer account, you can use jailbroken devices and Jailcoder. To use ...


5

Yes. You'll need an Apple Developer account which costs 99 USD a year. You'll be able to put your app on up to 100 devices. The enterprise program costs 299 USD and allows ad-hoc distribution of apps via configurator (for non-development purposes)


3

Base64 Automator Droplet You can use Automator to create your own Base64 droplet. Mac OS X includes openssl which can encode files to Base64; this superuser question explains how, OS X: Base64 encode via command line Launch Automator.app Create a new application Add a Run Shell Script action Set Pass input: to as arguments Within the script, replace echo ...


3

One of your possibilites is : Create an Automator service At the top select : Service receives selected image files in Finder Add a Shell Script action Put the following script in it openssl base64 < "$1" | pbcopy Save the service Now you can from the contextual menu > Service > yourServiceName of every image in the finder get the base64 ...


3

I don't see a feature in Alfred that looks like it will enable that directly (though I might have missed it). You can: open Automator create a new application add the "Run Shell Script" action paste in your command Select "Save..." from the file menu name it vlcnew.app Now Alfred should find that app if you type vlcnew.


3

There is really only one syntax mistake that you made. You put a space before Number in $ApplicationVersionNumber. However, most apps don't have a version.plist file. However, they always have the version in their Info.plist. Here is a fixed version of the script with a few improvements: #!/bin/sh ApplicationName=/Applications/FakeApp.app ...


2

When you launch it does it show an icon in the dock? If not it may be a command line program that is running inside terminal. If that is the case there are ways to make an Applescript/Automator wrap-around that will launch command line applications that should give you a dock icon. Having never done this myself, however, I am afraid you will have to do some ...


2

Yes, if the app is deleted after being downloaded, it still counts as a download. Deleting the app does not affect the ranking of the app. If you download the app over and over again using the same Apple ID, it will still count as one download. You cannot improve your rating by downloading the same app over and over again unless you use different Apple IDs. ...


2

Yes see Apple's documentation on bundle structure An OSX Application bundle must contain an Info.plist and expects certain keys including CFBundleExecutable whose definition is The name of the main executable file. This is the code that is executed when the user launches your application. Xcode typically sets the value of this key automatically at ...


2

I prefer Clicker Counter for a simple tally counter and Tally for more options (like multiple lists, count up or down, etc). Both are free to use.


2

I doubt if we support installing such (cracked) software, but I can at least give you the facts as I'm not explaining how to download or modify it to crack it. If you're talking about an .app which is originally downloaded from the Mac AppStore in this case, I can explain you the following details: Apps like this have their own sandbox (this is the same ...


2

It seems as though you are asking if the version numbers for iBooks on OSX and iOS are different for everyone else. The answer is that yes, these two apps which have the same name are actually wholly different apps, one for each operating system, and the version numbers are equally different. The most recent versions (as of the time of answering this mail) ...


1

Stub applications are smaller apps that do work for larger, more complex apps. For example, an app can request information from a stub app concurrently with a main process that the original app is running. Then, the stub app can return information back to the main process that initiated the stub binary.


1

You can do this with Activity Monitor. You can run this in the background with the window closed and it will track the data usage for the apps and services. In Mavericks, this is a separate Network tab, but you can add the Sent/Received columns to the view in Mountain Lion too.


1

If you examine using ps the command launched by Printer Setup or when adding a printer through System Preferences, you'll note that it includes a -psn qualifier that directs the application as to the "process serial number" to use to communicate with the application. This effectively tells it how to connect and launch the windows necessary for the calling ...


1

It's an old thread I know, but I had the same problem like you… Here is the solution: An application called iLock. Protects single apps with a password after your choice. Simple, efficient and completely free! https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/49881/ilock


1

Coincidentally, FileHippo isn't necessary for the vast majority of those apps you listed. Tons of Mac OS X apps use a framework called Sparkle for self updating. Don't download Sparkle, it won't do you any good. It's a developer tool intended to be added as part of the application's code. The point is that Sparkle (or some other self-updater) is already ...



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