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I prepared scheme:

Scheme (Amplifier I use is Pioneer A-307R http://www.pioneer.eu/eur/products/archive/A-307R/page.html

TV Samsung UE40D6750 http://www.samsung.com/uk/consumer/tv-audio-video/television/led-tv/UE40D6750WKXXU)

I connected to Apple TV both HDMI and TOSLINK to be able stream only Music (without need to have TV turn on).

The key point here is the "2RCA to 1RCA" connector, which makes the volume up when one of the device (TV or AppleTV) is turn off. (Or makes the volume down when one of the device turn on alongside other).

For Example:

While you watching TV on TV alone, when you turn on the Apple TV the volume goes down, when you turn off the Apple TV it again goes up to the original level.

Could you explain me why it happens ? And how can I make it work without the volume going up and down?

I thought of ARC system where I will get rid of the TOSLINK cable, and plug the the HDMI directly to the Amplifier, although my Amplifier doesn't support ARC , and I doubt that there are connectors that make it possible to be compatible with ARC and have RCA output.

Thank you very much for your time and help.

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migrated from superuser.com Aug 15 '13 at 7:08

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2 Answers 2

It is dropping in level because the end of an audio connection usually has a termination point. and/or the signal is being routed to electronics that are adding slight resistances to the signal. (in simple terms there is a cap on the end :-)

The least solution, would be to use an isolation transformer to one of the connection point, then one of the Yed signals could be isolated from the other device.

The most solution would be to use an audio distribution amp. Or to route through a device that would passthrough the audio (unterminated) Like some amps or pre-amps. or to use other devices (like a equaliser) that would have 2 seperated outputs.

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@Psycogeek You mean something like this: store.acousticfrontiers.com/… That will prevent audio signal from going up to the other cable? –  Paul Brewczynski Aug 15 '13 at 9:06

If I'm understanding correctly, you're using "2RCA to 1RCA" splitters to combine your two signals into a single input for your amplifier.

Typically you would use a mixer for this purpose, rather than simply connecting the wires together. You could get a cheap mixer (e.g. from eBay) that supports 2x Stereo inputs (technically that's 4 channels) to a stereo output, and use that instead of the 2-to-1 RCA splitters. Mixers often use the larger headphone jack (1/4" or 6.35mm), so you may need adaptors from RCA as well.

The other option is to have a switcher, rather than mixer, if you only actually want one of the signals at any given time. These are considerably cheaper, but require you to manually change them (which you're perhaps trying to avoid?). These are often 3-channel (they include video), but can still be used to switch between multiple audio sources.

Also worth checking if your amplifier has multiple inputs that you could use; some have basic switching or mixing capabilities inbuilt.

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This model : pioneer.eu/eur/products/archive/A-307R/page.html Unfortunately rather doesn't have mixer. –  Paul Brewczynski Aug 15 '13 at 9:32
    
I wonder if the better solution would be buy the Amplifier that supports Audio Return Channel (ARC) –  Paul Brewczynski Aug 15 '13 at 9:44
    
@bluesm, so your amp has 6 stereo input channels which you can switch between. If mixing is important, get a mixer. Otherwise just plug the output from the TOSLINK adaptor into, say, PHONO and the output from the TV into, say, LINE, and choose the appropriate source on the amp remote when you change between them. –  drfrogsplat Aug 16 '13 at 1:05

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