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My Macbook Pro is not booting normally. I tried many options but no success. If I try to recovery mode or try to boot from USB, a blue screen appears. So I can't do fresh install. I checked hardware test, it says ok, I used the disk in target disk mode in my another macbook pro and it runs on there. Only in this machine the problem is occurring.

Youtube Video about the problem: http://youtu.be/mBk-qcvktPs

If you know the solution help me please.

Spec: MacBook Pro, Intel Core i7 Processor Speed: 2 GHz

Memory: 8GB

Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 6490M VRAM: 256 MB

Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 3000

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That's a very strange issue. Have you tried the typical SMC and PRAM reset? Judging that you're running on a relatively new i7 chip, is there a chance you can take in to an Apple store? Generally problems persisting regardless of boot drive are caused by a hardware problem. Try taking out one RAM module (booting with just one) and then replacing it to isolate the other. That can help eliminate suspicion of a memory issue. –  XAleXOwnZX Apr 11 '13 at 1:13
    
The problem happened 2nd time. Somedays ago when it first occurred, I took it to nearby Apple authorised service centre. After 3 days they fix it and noted just format the disk and re-installed lion, there is no hardware problem. But after 3 days again the same problem occurred. I changed RAM as you said but the issue isn't solving. And I did PRAM, and disconnected Battery for sometimes. But unsuccessful. –  user47187 Apr 11 '13 at 1:33
    
Hmm that's really strange. It'd be hard to narrow down the problem. I would usually diagnose these problems with my copy of Apple's Service Diagnostics (thank you Pirate Bay) which gives very low level information on the performance of the machine. I really don't know what could be wrong in this case =/ –  XAleXOwnZX Apr 11 '13 at 2:49
    
Thanks @XAleXOwnZX for your kind information and advice. I started downloading from (pirate bay) after I got the app I'll test again. –  user47187 Apr 11 '13 at 2:54
    
I downloaded Apple Service Diagnostics, and I'm able to do EFI test, no hardware problem, all test passed. Then I tried to boot via OS Test. After I select it a loading icon occurs and at last the white screen shows. The same white screen shows in normal boot up, recovery boot up. If I try safe mode then instead of white screen a blue screen shows. –  user47187 Apr 12 '13 at 4:52
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1 Answer 1

From the tests you made we can eliminate a list of potential culprit candidates:

  1. memory: hardware tests
  2. internal disk: use in target mode but you might be tougher on this test: in target disk mode fire Disk Utility and perform some (ex.: 4) Verify disk one after the other.

  3. OS: re-install by an Apple service center

Here are the remaining candidates:

  1. motherboard
  2. graphical cards

Receipe to kill other culprit candidates

If your problem is just due to a graphical chain problem, your system might be correctly booted, but you can't notice it. To check this probability, you will have to set your Mac so as to be able to remotely verify that it is alive or dead.

  • Connect the bad Mac to a good one with an Ethernet cable,

  • Boot the culprit Mac, even if it does just show you his blue screen,

  • Open a Terminal on good Mac, and get the broadcasting IP address. The following command will display it:

        ifconfig en0
    

    behind the keyword broadcast (3rd line). You may also get it at first with a slightly more tricky command:

       ifconfig en0 | sed -n 's,^.*broadcast \(.*\)$,\1,p'
    

    Let's say that it is broacast_IP (most probably it will be 169.254.255.255).

  • do a ping broadcast to see how many Mac are alive:

        ping broadcast_IP
    

    if this command reply you with 2 different IP addresses, then you can conclude that bad Mac is alive and its graphical chain is dead.

    On the other hand, if you only get a reply of your good Mac, then bad Mac is really dead, and the last culprit is the good (i.e. motherboard).

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