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I am working on a project remotely, and I have MACOSX 10.7.4 installed. The server is Ubuntu linux based, and I use "ssh" to access it. Recently the openSSH server in the remote server being secured by obfuscated ssh, so I have to login it with enhanced ssh command, in Windows, it's Potty software to support it. In Ubuntu Linux, it has "ssh" command with "-Z" option.

I found there is no -Z option in the "ssh" command of MacOS, so I upgrade openSSH to the latest one (6.01p1), still no this option. I am wondering why in Ubuntu linux, it's also openSSH package, but do have "-Z" option, but for the same package in MacOS, there is no "-Z" option at all?

By the way, "-Z" option will enable "ssh" to use obfuscated data (TCP header) communication. Any help is appreciated, I need a ssh client which can do support obfuscated communication.

About Obfuscated-openSSH, please check this - https://github.com/brl/obfuscated-openssh

Here is the usage displayed in Ubuntu Linux - "ssh" :

OpenSSH_5.2p1, OpenSSL 0.9.8k 25 Mar 2009
usage: ssh [-1246AaCfgKkMNnqsTtVvXxYyz] [-b bind_address] [-c cipher_spec]
           [-D [bind_address:]port] [-e escape_char] [-F configfile]
           [-i identity_file] [-L [bind_address:]port:host:hostport]
           [-l login_name] [-m mac_spec] [-O ctl_cmd] [-o option] [-p port]
           [-R [bind_address:]port:host:hostport] [-S ctl_path]
           [-w local_tun[:remote_tun]] [-Z obfuscate_keyword]
           [user@]hostname [command]

Here is the usage displayed in MacOS by "ssh" -

OpenSSH_6.0p1, OpenSSL 0.9.8r 8 Feb 2011
usage: ssh [-1246AaCfgKkMNnqsTtVvXxYy] [-b bind_address] [-c cipher_spec]
           [-D [bind_address:]port] [-e escape_char] [-F configfile]
           [-I pkcs11] [-i identity_file]
           [-L [bind_address:]port:host:hostport]
           [-l login_name] [-m mac_spec] [-O ctl_cmd] [-o option] [-p port]
           [-R [bind_address:]port:host:hostport] [-S ctl_path]
           [-W host:port] [-w local_tun[:remote_tun]]
           [user@]hostname [command]
share|improve this question
    
Please, provide information about you have done OpenSSH upgrade. I have 10.8.3 and have OpenSSH_5.9p1. –  Eir Nym Mar 21 '13 at 9:04
    
Hi what kind of information you want to know? –  Tom Mar 21 '13 at 9:06
    
When you use ssh, the communication between client and server is encrypted, but the TCP header is not, obfuscated ssh is a way to encrypt the header, so make it more secure. –  Tom Mar 21 '13 at 9:09
    
github.com/brl/obfuscated-openssh –  Tom Mar 21 '13 at 9:19

1 Answer 1

Problem sovled. You can download obfuscated-openssh and compile it in MacOS to get a new ssh command.

  1. download it from https://github.com/brl/obfuscated-openssh
  2. download and install gcc - http://www.mkyong.com/mac/how-to-install-gcc-compiler-on-mac-os-x/

    ./Configure

    make

  3. if there are some errors while compiling it, remember to check this https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2546848?start=0&tstart=0

All done, you will have a new ssh, ./ssh -v -

OpenSSH_5.2p1, OpenSSL 0.9.8r 8 Feb 2011
usage: ssh [-1246AaCfgKkMNnqsTtVvXxYyz] [-b bind_address] [-c cipher_spec]
           [-D [bind_address:]port] [-e escape_char] [-F configfile]
           [-i identity_file] [-L [bind_address:]port:host:hostport]
           [-l login_name] [-m mac_spec] [-O ctl_cmd] [-o option] [-p port]
           [-R [bind_address:]port:host:hostport] [-S ctl_path]
           [-w local_tun[:remote_tun]] [-Z obfuscate_keyword]
           [user@]hostname [command]
share|improve this answer
    
You are not really installing gcc but the Xcode command line tools - better to say that –  Mark Mar 21 '13 at 13:38
    
You definitely prefer create formulare for home brew or Portfile for MacPorts –  Eir Nym Mar 21 '13 at 19:38
    
What about heartbleed? Is there a version of obfuscated-ssh without this flaw? –  Mark Fisher Oct 16 at 5:40

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