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I haven't found any useful info about what to do when asked for a password whilst sharing files between Mac and Windows. My scenario: I have ONE user on my Mac (somebrit) and no one else, not even guest. I have ONE fileshare located at /Users/somebrit/share.

I'm using Mountain Lion -> System Preferences -> File Sharing -> SMB Sharing and have selected the folder to share. For all intents and purposes, I've allowed unrestricted access to it.

On the Windows side, I simply hit Start, type \\IP\ and can see the Mac. After clicking it, I'm instantly prompted for a username/password and having tried my-mac\somebrit and the password, nothing.

Can someone please help my sanity and provide some answers?

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2 Answers

When connecting to a Mac from a PC for file sharing, you should be able to use your full username that shows up on your login screen and the password associated with it. For example, when connecting from a PC to a Mac someone with the username "John Doe" would sign in using that as the username. They would use their password associated with that account as their password, but make sure that that account is enabled in System Preferences to support SMB file sharing, because if the account is not enabled, then you cannot log in. Here is a screenshot of what I mean: http://i.stack.imgur.com/Uwfrq.png

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From my experience, I use the IP address then the user's name. For example, instead of using my-mac\somebrit, use [my-mac's_IP_address]\somebrit and you will get in. Your hostname may only be in the mode where only only other Macs can view my-mac. Remember, Macs communicate via SMB to Windows machines for file share. Mac to Mac, you can use AFP in conjunction with SMB.

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