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I have Mountain Lion on an 27" iMac, and recently, for some reason, the Mail app launches every 10 minutes or so, and I have to quit it every time.

In the Preferences of Mail, I already tried every possible way to tell it not to start itself, but every 10 minutes or so, it still launches and I have to quit it manually. I don't know whether it is because I set in Gmail calendar to send email alert on some special events in my Google Calendar, but that should be handled by the Gmail server, not the Mail app...

I don't know whether it is related to the Notification Center, as the last few times, I notices messages popping up at the top right corner of the screen, and the Mail just started to run all by itself as well.

Is there a way to stop it from running automatically?

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It might be related to the "All day event" in Google Calendar, which I set to send me email notification as a reminder, and this seems to trigger the Mail app to run –  動靜能量 Nov 30 '12 at 0:56
    
Same happens here. There's no way to keep it closed, and it hogs up a lot of CPU and memory. –  obvio171 Jan 8 '13 at 18:26
    
I have a similar problem in that it launches whenever I wake up my mac with Mountain Lion. It always comes up with the "Welcome to Mail" setup wizard. Since I don't want to use the app I cancel this, but I can't get to preferences or anything else until entering valid email and password credentials that I don't want to give. -- I believe it's started for the purposes of showing notifications. So I've just gone to the notifications settings and unselected everything about mail so that it now says mail is not in notification center. I'll revisit here if that does it. –  dlamblin Jan 18 '13 at 15:37
    
@動靜能量 What I wrote before has not stopped the mail app from starting after the mac was sleeping and asking for credentials. –  dlamblin Jan 20 '13 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

This is not normal behavior. Edit your question with your console log information from the moment of launch, it might help. Notification center will provide alerts when mail arrives if set to do so, and clicking on a message will launch Mail. Mail messages also reside in the notification center and clicking one there will also launch mail. Short of these events, Mail should not launch itself, unless you have some background process or script you are unaware of.

There is a background process or helper to allow the notification center to show incoming messages while Mail.app itself isn't running. This is normal behavior. If Mail is turned off in the notification system preference you won't have any intrusions.

Of course different things such as shell scripts, other apps and so on can launch apps so if you've configured other apps to launch Mail you need to deal with that scenario. This is where the log files can give you a hint as to what happened immediately prior to Mail launching.

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Where do we find the console log information? –  Trevoke Jan 31 '13 at 17:57
    
/Applications/Utilities/Console.app or just do a spotlight search for Console and run it. Click "All Messages" or "system.log" in the sidebar and look at the timestamps and the "Mail" name in the log list. You might have to first click "show log list" in the toolbar. –  geoO Feb 6 '13 at 18:41

Check this article, it may help stop mail from launching.

http://www.macworld.com/article/2012894/stop-mail-launching-for-calendar-alerts.html

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  George Garside Oct 4 '13 at 14:32

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