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I bought today a SSD hard drive (Kingston HyperX 3K 120Gb) and the problem is the negotiated velocity speed is set to SATA I (1.5 Gigabit), but the negotiated velocity should be SATA II (3 Gigabit). My MacBook Pro is a late 2008 (5,1).

What is going wrong?

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3 Answers 3

The problem stems from what i believe with that model is that if you stuck the hard drive into the optical drive bay the actual link speed of the SATA in that bay is only SATA I (1.5 Gigabit). If you take that hard drive out and swap places with the hard drive in the regular slot you should be able to get full SATA II out of your SSD and should not notice much of a speed difference of your old hard drive if it is placed in the SATA I optical drive slot.

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My machine is a MacBook Pro, there is only a one data port for my SSD drive. –  KaNeXP Jun 28 '12 at 18:51
    
Ok i guess your not doing what i thought you were doing. I have a Macbook Pro and it is a common practice for people to remove their optical drives and place and extra hard drive in that slot. As that is not your case you have a different problem. Check to make sure that you bought a SSD that is SATA II and maybe try unplugging it and plugging it back in again. Also you can check to see if there is a switch on the SSD that forces it into SATA I mode for legacy hardware. Although i highly doubt that manufactures are putting this feature on SSDs –  Chad Marmon Jun 28 '12 at 18:56
    
Thanks for your time and your answers. I don't know what is the problem, other trademarks, like OCZ make a firmware to update and solve this problem, but I don't see in forums for Kingston SSD. –  KaNeXP Jun 28 '12 at 19:19
    
Yea I'm doing some research and finding the same thing. Plus interesting enough i just went and looked at my hard drive and i have the same problem and i have never noticed it before. This is with the orginal hard drive from Apple. –  Chad Marmon Jun 28 '12 at 19:22
    
if you make a velocity speed test you will see the bad speed writing and reading, my SSD can write 510mb/s but with this problem only in 103mb/s ... –  KaNeXP Jun 28 '12 at 19:30

If nothing else solves the problem, perhaps you should return your Kingston hard drive and purchase a different brand with better support for Apple Macintosh.

I have had good success with an SSD from Other World Computing (macsales.com). They specialize in products designed for compatibility with Apple Macs.

They also have knowledgeable Mac-friendly tech support for the products they sell.

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You needs to do a SMC RESET procedure on the MBP after the installation. It might help reset the AHCI driver to the new SSD disk to get the 3.0Gbps negotiated link. It might work depending on the revision of the MCP79 chip that the MBP uses. I have the same model and researched all the problems with it.

If the SMC reset did NOT work, you are stuck with 1.5GB but be happy that the disk actually works because others are getting ramdom hands/slowdown and after a few weeks the SSD becomes DEAD (would not boot anymore).

On the OCZ models, they did a firmware tweak to FORCE the link to be SATA2 to get the 3GB speed, but this will make the CD driver not workable in some cases. The issue here was the AHCI specs were not implemented fully by Nvidia and there are power issues when the drive is operating. On many cases, a large read will cause the beachball wait effect since the drivers will be reset by the hardware several times in an effort to recover the operating link. It will reboot if the condition gets worse. From what I hear , OCZ nailed the problem at the expense of CD driver operation which is acceptable to the user. Apple never wanted to do this for fear of legal repercussions they might endure. So OCZ is the only way to go for this MBP model becuase other drives with SF 2281 controllers are having serious problems. There are people with Rev B logic board that did NOT have such a problem. Unless, you had your board replaced recently, you are likely stuck to the Rev A board which had this weakness.

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