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What does the “i” in Apple product names mean?

What started the whole "i" movement and what does the "i" stand for when talking about iPods, iPhones, iMacs, iPads and iCarly (woops!). I think it started with the iMac that came out in the late 90's, but still have always wondered where the "i" came from in terms of the product. Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by Jason Salaz, Kyle Cronin Feb 6 '12 at 21:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It stands for 'internet Mac', iMac. There was an answer on this site about it before, but I can't find it at the moment. –  Jason Salaz Feb 6 '12 at 21:46

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According to Wikipedia, Apple declared the 'i' in iMac to stand for "Internet"; it also represented the product's focus as a personal device ('i' for "individual").

The following is interesting to see the order, which is effectively iMac, iPod, iLife, iSight, iWork, iPhone, iPad (Where's the iBook?, iTunes?)

enter image description here

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How about How did Apple choose the 'i' naming convention?

We returned with five names, one of which we all loved: iMac. Each option came with a presentation board briefly describing why it was a good name. For iMac, it was obviously all about the i. Most important, it stood for Internet. But it also stood for other valuable i things, like individual, imagination, i as in me, etc. It also did a pretty good job of laying a solid foundation for future product naming. The “i” naming nomenclature became so pervasive Steve became the iCEO for a number of years. There was even a Time magazine story that cemented this title.

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