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I want the whole surface of the CD to be burned, is there a way to do this with a image disk for example or do I have to add junk ?

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I'm curious, why do you need to do this? –  conorgriffin Jan 8 '12 at 21:03
1  
Microsoft incuded Microsoft Bob on every Windows XP disk; encrypted with the key thrown out for the same purpose. –  vcsjones Jan 8 '12 at 21:45
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@vcsjones, I was gonna flag your comment as spam because it was such a ridiculous statement. Then I clicked the link. Unbelievable. Now I've voted you up :-) –  user479 Jan 10 '12 at 5:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. Create the disk image first.. As a sparseimage or a dmg, etc… Just make sure it is the final size of your desired media… (presets are available in the "New" panel.

  2. Mount it.. Put what you want on it…

  3. Burn it. If it's a 700MB image… It'll get burned on all 700 MB.

Peace.

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Are you sure ? I tried before and Toast showed the empty space. In Disk Utility I choose CD-ROM 80min but it corresponds to 660MB :-\ and if I choose 700MB I get a 717MB file in the end –  user2113 Jan 9 '12 at 2:00
    
a 700 MB CDR is really only 660 MB in "reality".. sort of like a 32GB iPhone is really only 28.6 GB, or whatever. "there is a nearly 5% difference between the powers of 1000 definition and the powers of 1024 definition. Furthermore, the difference is compounded by 2.4% with each incrementally larger prefix (gigabyte, terabyte, etc.) The discrepancy between the two conventions for measuring capacity was the subject of several class action suits against HDD manufacturers" You can read about it on Wikipedia –  alex gray Jan 9 '12 at 3:04

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