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I'm working on getting Python installed on my Mac 10.5.8 and I have been having a heck of a lot of trouble.

The standard downloads at do not show a compatible version.

  • They have 10.3 - 10.6 for 32 bit
  • They have 10.6 - 10.7 for 64 bit

I tried downloading and installing the 32 bit version for 10.5, yet when launching the IDLE, it "Unexpectedly" quits.

I've been told that Python comes pre-installed on Mac OSX computers, but when running "python" in the terminal I receive this error:

william-johnsons-macbook:~ Will$ python
dyld: unknown required load command 0x80000022
Trace/BPT trap
william-johnsons-macbook:~ Will$ 

If anyone has any advice or other references not on the site, I would really appreciate it.

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migrated from Sep 17 '11 at 22:29

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The binaries on aren't really the best way to install python on OS X. You should really be using homebrew anyway: – Aaron Gallagher Sep 17 '11 at 16:52
@AaronGallagher can you give any reason for that? the Apple python maillist suggests the python one over packages + homebrew should end up the same as the one – Mark Sep 24 '11 at 19:21
@user950280 - if you get that at the prompt you have a broken install - what does which python show or /usr/bin/python – Mark Sep 24 '11 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

It's been a long time since I had to do this for 10.5.8, but I followed these instructions: (note that the original website is gone, hence the WayBack link)

Here's a post I made on the topic back when I was trying:

But, do you need 64 bit python on 10.5.8? Frankly, I don't think it's worth the pain - I'd pay a few bucks and upgrade to 10.6 or 10.7.

If it's just a problem with 32-bit python, which python are you using? (i.e., what does which python return?)

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What's about python from MacPorts? it is the same as from, but for your architecture and you can manage libs more easily.

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