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I did a quick, pseudo-system audit this morning and found an unexpected directory hogging up ~10GB of space on my drive. I assume that it's a remnant from a reasonably recent upgrade to XCode 4, but that's more of a guess than anything else.

I'm not an Objective-C/Cocoa developer. XCode is really installed just to support Homebrew. Off the top of my head, I can't think of anything else that I do with it.

Are these older 3.2.x directories safe to delete if I can reinstall Xcode 4 or will doing so make kittens cry?

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hmmm I thought x-code 4 moved stuff to the Developer-old folder but...if you have X-Code 4 installed and you want to delete all the remnants of X-Code 3 (which you can definitely do if you aren't a developer) sudo /Developer-3.2.6/Library/uninstall-devtools --mode=all better to do it that way than just a rm command. The only thing I am not positive about is what will break - ie; you might have to re-download and install xcode 4 again to get some command line stuff back....(which is why I'm not posting this as an answer just a comment) still just backup and restore if SHTF –  lemonginger Sep 16 '11 at 17:09
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Removing the old version of Xcode (using the uninstall script shown by lemonginger) will not break v4. –  cksum Sep 16 '11 at 17:12
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2 Answers

Do you use XCode? If you don't go run the XCode uninstaller script, then go to the GCC installer github page and download that. It should let you keep running Homebrew without needing all the very disk heavy XCode iOS/OS X stuff included.

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Nuke it (you've got a backup, right?)

If you run sudo /Developer-3.2.6/Library/uninstall-devtools it should clean up things like terminal add ons, but they take little space.

Since you only use gcc and such for homebrew - you'll not need all the SDK and such from this old alternate install of Xcode. One compiler set is plenty unless you're really into maintaining some old code that breaks when the newer compiler sees it.

It's probably from an old install where you could pick an alternate destination - not something Xcode 4 moved around.

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