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I am a little disenchanted with development on the Mac right now. I need a single IDE that can handle all of my development needs. I did notice there are other questions on this topic already, but those did not cover my specific needs of:

  • Must support at least HTML, JavaScript, Ruby on Rails and PHP syntax highlighting, bonus if there are more language plug-ins available
  • Must support the ability to connect to FTP and SFTP
  • Must support handling of projects/sites
  • Must have some level of code completion, even if it is just at the variable level
  • Must support syntax formatting
  • Must be able to recognize and highlight ERB/TPL files as HTML

Are there any suggestions for such an IDE out there?

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vim or emacs coupled with Transmit meet all the requirements you have enumerated. I wouldn't call either the ultimate IDE but both meet the stated requirements. –  bmike May 10 '11 at 20:21
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Emacs doesn't even need Transmit to do all these things. :-) –  Ken Aug 8 '12 at 17:07
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10 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I actually think the idea of a single, unified, development environment like what you're after is somewhat antithetical to OS X design principles. One of the great things I've found, since switching to OS X for development work about a year ago, is that many OS X application developers share my own personal philosophy when it comes to software: do less, but do it really, really well.

As such, my current development environment on OS X is less unified than it was on Windows or Linux, but far, far more stable, robust, and ultimately: productive.

For coding I use TextMate. It seems almost trivially simple at first and then you discover bundles and it's built-in command line filtering and it takes off. It will handle the highlighting tasks you requested. It has projects, and while they seem kind of loose at first, you'll grow to appreciate it. Trust me. And it does handle code completion, tag closing, tag matching -- the sort of stuff you'd expect -- it's just not obvious, but it's there in Bundles and waiting for you to customize it.

Update: I've moved off TextMate and on to Sublime Text 2. The regular updates and the Python-based extensions were a major draw. It's been a year now and no regrets with that switch.

I use Kaleidoscope for diffs. It's just an a beautiful diff tool.

My git tool is Tower and my Subversion tool is Versions. Both awesome.

For permanent, remote drive access via ssh I use MacFUSE to connect to the remote location and mount it as a drive on my Mac. This is a superior option to built-in ssh or ftp support in the IDE because all the programs on my Mac can now work with files on that share.

I also use CyberDuck for it's awesome cost and excellent Amazon S3 support. I could even get away with just CyberDuck, no MacFUSE, if I had to. But I don't. :)

Update: I've switched to ForkLift 2 as my primary means to interact with remote file systems. It's got a nicer UI than CyberDuck and a few less "quirks" to it. I'll still occasionally open up CyberDuck when I need to deliver a signed URL to an S3 object.

Finally: iTerm 2. A terminal app befitting OS X. It really is quite a fantastic terminal. Bookmarks make it easy to get to my AWS machines quickly. The UI is clean. And tabs.

All of those things replace the clunky IDE (Komodo Pro) I use to use on Linux and Windows (and never really liked, just tolerated). And I don't even know that they're not all "unified" in one cluttered, modal window. No sir.

For reference, I write a lot Python, some HTML, JavaScript, Perl, and Java. And the occasional bit of C and C++.

Update: There's more Go in my day to day coding now. My toolset integrated that relatively young language without so much as a hiccup.

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If you replace MacFUSE & Cyberduck with Transmit.app, then you're my guy :) –  nuc Mar 21 '11 at 13:04
    
@nuc: I haven't hit a case where those two didn't cover me yet. But when I do, Transmit will be bought for sure. :) –  Ian C. Mar 22 '11 at 3:45
    
Update: I've switch to Forklift for most of my remote filesystem interactions. I'll occasionally use Cyberduck when I need to generate a signed URL on an S3 object and that's about it now. –  Ian C. Aug 8 '12 at 15:29
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Sublime Text 2

I couldn't have said it better:

Sublime Text has grown to become my favorite GUI code editor. It feels like a spiritual successor to TextMate (even allowing support for some TextMate bundles like snippets and themes), and has many original+natural features like fully independent text cursors, a very nice search feature, and a rapidly-growing plugin API and surrounding community.

enter image description here

Check it out, it's freaking awesome.
(And it works on Windows and Linux too!)

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I'm waiting for Chocolat beta or TextMate 2 myself. Mainly because they would be "exclusive for the Mac, and that is how we like it!". –  Lauri Ranta Oct 31 '11 at 6:14
    
@to each his/her own, but I admit when a Mac programmer tells me Sublime isn't their favorite GUI text editor, I assume they only ever tried it once or twice. –  username Aug 8 '12 at 19:21
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You can go for NetBeans, it's quite good and I prefer it.

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yes i used netbeans too. But it will be nice if we have IDE run natively on mac :) –  GusDeCooL Oct 29 '11 at 14:51
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It's not an IDE, but the Vim editor does everything that you have asked for and much, much more!

Vim!

Even better, it comes pre-installed with Mac OS X. Also, once you have used it on OS X, you can use it on Windows, Linux, BSD, Amiga OS...

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I've been impressed with Aptana 3 - give it a try. It has Smarty support.

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Which is based on Eclipse –  Mark Mar 21 '11 at 13:55
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For web development in particular, there is Coda. I would also recommend Textmate from Macromates.

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Oddly there is no mention of Eclipse yet. Its not just for Java, there are plugins for almost all the languages out there. I've used it on my MacBook Pro for years.

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Another alternative is Komodo IDE: "The Professional IDE for Python, PHP, Ruby, JavaScript, Perl and Web Dev"

You can customize syntax highlighting if you want too. Have a look at the features.

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JetBrains WebStorm is a commercial IDE for JavaScript, CSS & HTML built on JetBrains' IntelliJ IDEA platform. WebStorm is a specialised version of PhpStorm, offering a subset of its features. WebStorm ships with pre-installed JavaScript plugins (such as for Node.js)

enter image description here

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I have tried SubLime , it is brilliant in looks . And one of the best thing about it is the fact that even if you force quit it , it will retain state of the app . So all of the tabs you were working on will get restored . It's much needed when you accidently close the app .

About TextMate , that's nice too . But Sublime is certainly +1 .

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